A US senator is calling for a probe into Pokémon GO's privacy issues

A Democratic U.S. senator on Tuesday asked the software developer behind Nintendo Co Ltd's Pokémon GO to clarify the mobile game's data privacy protections, amid concerns the augmented reality hit was unnecessarily collecting vast swaths of sensitive user data.

A Democratic U.S. senator on Tuesday asked the software developer behind Nintendo Co Ltd's Pokémon GO to clarify the mobile game's data privacy protections, amid concerns the augmented reality hit was unnecessarily collecting vast swaths of sensitive user data.

Senator Al Franken of Minnesota sent a letter to Niantic Chief Executive John Hanke asking what user data Pokémon GO collects, how the data is used and with what third party service providers that data may be shared.

The game, which marries Pokémon, the classic 20-year-old cartoon franchise, with augmented reality, allows players to walk around real-life neighborhoods while seeking virtual Pokémon game characters on their smartphone screens - a scavenger hunt that has earned enthusiastic early reviews.

Franken also asked Niantic to describe how it ensures parents give "meaningful consent" to a child's use of the game and subsequent collection of his or her personal information.

"I am concerned about the extent to which Niantic may be unnecessarily collecting, using, and sharing a wide range of users’ personal information without their appropriate consent," Franken wrote.

"As the augmented reality market evolves, I ask that you provide greater clarity on how Niantic is addressing issues of user privacy and security, particularly that of its younger players," he added.

Franken additionally asked Niantic to provide an update on a vulnerability detected on Monday by security researchers who found Pokémon GO players signing into the game via a Google account on an Apple iOS device unwittingly gave "full access permission" to the person's Google account.

Pokémon GO on Tuesday released an updated version on iOS to reduce the number of data permissions it sought from Google account users.

Niantic did not immediately respond to a request for comment about Franken's inquiry.

The company, spun off by Google last year, created the game in tandem with Pokémon Co, a third of which is owned by Nintendo.

Pokémon GO has been a smash hit for Nintendo. The Japanese company's first venture in mobile gaming brought market-value gains of $7.5 billion in just two days after the game's release last week.

Franken asked for a response by Aug. 12.

Reuters

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