Shoaib Akhtar reveals match-fixing was at its peak in 1996; says he was never involved

Akhtar also claimed to have warned fixing convict Mohammad Amir back in 2010 to avoid meeting people who could lure players to match-fixing.

IANS October 17, 2016 18:10:45 IST
Shoaib Akhtar reveals match-fixing was at its peak in 1996; says he was never involved

Karachi: Former Pakistan pacer Shoaib Akhtar claimed on Tuesday that match-fixing was at its worst in 1996 but himself refrained from getting involved in the malpractice.

Shoaib Akhtar reveals matchfixing was at its peak in 1996 says he was never involved

"The atmosphere of the Pakistan dressing room was very strange... Trust me it was the worst possible dressing room," Akhtar was quoted as saying by Geo News.

The 'Rawalpindi Express' added he always stayed away from fixing circles and cautioned other people about it, advising team-mates to play with integrity and sincerity.

Akhtar also claimed to have warned fixing convict Mohammad Amir back in 2010 to avoid meeting people who could lure players to match-fixing.

Amir served a five-year suspension after admitting to fixing in 2010. He returned to action last year and is now a regular in the Pakistan team.

Akhtar said he had intervened to put an end to a recent public spat between Javed Miandad and Shahid Afridi, urging the two warring former Pakistan skippers to resolve the matter through dialogue.

"To resolve the matter through talks was the most possible solution. I spoke to Afridi and Javed bhai to settle the matter outside court. If it would have go to the court, then a lot of names would have cropped up," Akhtar told Geo TV.

"My main concern was that. I told Afridi not to send a legal notice and advised Javed bhai to keep control of his anger and not say anything controversial in public. He exceeded limits by uttering unnecessary things."

The 41-year-old said Miandad and Afridi's spat could have opened a Pandora's Box, tarnishing Pakistan cricket's image worldwide.

The bitter feud erupted when Miandad accused Afridi of fixing matches for money.

"Things are said in the heat of the moment and I also said some inappropriate things in the heat of the moment. I take them back," Miandad said recently.

They later resolved their differences, posting a video online in which Miandad took back his words and Afridi apologised, stating he had always considered Miandad as his elder brother.

Akhtar also lauded the Pakistan team for their recent limited overs victory against the West Indies and expressed reservations over the use of pink ball in Tests.

He said the cricket officials should consider a number of factors before deciding to schedule a Day/Night Test, such as the local weather and pitch conditions.

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