China imposes sanctions on Republican U.S. lawmakers over Hong Kong

BEIJING (Reuters) - China imposed sanctions on 11 U.S. citizens including lawmakers from President Donald Trump Republican Party on Monday in response to Washington's imposition of sanctions on Hong Kong and Chinese officials accused of curtailing political freedoms in the former British colony. Those targeted were six Republican lawmakers - Senators Ted Cruz, Marco Rubio, Tom Cotton, Josh Hawley and Pat Toomey and Representative Chris Smith - as well as individuals at non-profit and rights groups

Reuters August 11, 2020 00:12:55 IST
China imposes sanctions on Republican U.S. lawmakers over Hong Kong

China imposes sanctions on Republican US lawmakers over Hong Kong

BEIJING (Reuters) - China imposed sanctions on 11 U.S. citizens including lawmakers from President Donald Trump Republican Party on Monday in response to Washington's imposition of sanctions on Hong Kong and Chinese officials accused of curtailing political freedoms in the former British colony.

Those targeted were six Republican lawmakers - Senators Ted Cruz, Marco Rubio, Tom Cotton, Josh Hawley and Pat Toomey and Representative Chris Smith - as well as individuals at non-profit and rights groups.

"In response to that wrong U.S. behaviour, China has decided to impose sanctions on individuals who have behaved egregiously on Hong Kong-related issues," Chinese foreign ministry spokesman Zhao Lijian told a press briefing on Monday.

He did not specify what the sanctions entail.

Relations between the two countries have deteriorated sharply in recent months over issues ranging from trade, to Hong Kong and China's handling of the novel coronavirus . Trump has made tough talk against China a feature of his campaign for re-election.

China's sanctions are the latest in a tit-for-tat round of measures between Beijing and Washington over accusations of rights abuses and interference.

The United States on Friday imposed sanctions on Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam and the city's current and former police chiefs.

The U.S. lawmakers targeted by China on Monday have been among vocal critics of a new national security law that Beijing imposed on Hong Kong in late June.

Members of Congress typically take sanctions from U.S. adversaries as compliments, not problems. Hawley's office issued a statement that he would not "back down" and that he would "continue defending America's interests."

It was the second time recently China has announced sanctions against Republicans. Last month, Beijing targeted Cruz, Rubio and Smith after Washington penalized Chinese officials over the treatment of Uighur Muslims.

Beijing's latest measure includes sanctions against the heads of five U.S.-based, non-government organizations. All five groups had been subjected to sanctions in December in connection with their positions on Hong Kong.

(Reporting by Yew Lun Tian and Cate Cadell, additional reporting by Patricia Zengerle in Washington; Writing by Tony Munroe; Editing by Robert Birsel and Alistair Bell)

This story has not been edited by Firstpost staff and is generated by auto-feed.

Updated Date:

TAGS:

also read

France, Germany to agree to NATO role against Islamic State - sources
| Reuters
World

France, Germany to agree to NATO role against Islamic State - sources | Reuters

By Robin Emmott and John Irish | BRUSSELS/PARIS BRUSSELS/PARIS France and Germany will agree to a U.S. plan for NATO to take a bigger role in the fight against Islamic militants at a meeting with President Donald Trump on Thursday, but insist the move is purely symbolic, four senior European diplomats said.The decision to allow the North Atlantic Treaty Organization to join the coalition against Islamic State in Syria and Iraq follows weeks of pressure on the two allies, who are wary of NATO confronting Russia in Syria and of alienating Arab countries who see NATO as pushing a pro-Western agenda."NATO as an institution will join the coalition," said one senior diplomat involved in the discussions. "The question is whether this just a symbolic gesture to the United States

China's Xi says navy should become world class
| Reuters
World

China's Xi says navy should become world class | Reuters

BEIJING Chinese President Xi Jinping on Wednesday called for greater efforts to make the country's navy a world class one, strong in operations on, below and above the surface, as it steps up its ability to project power far from its shores.China's navy has taken an increasingly prominent role in recent months, with a rising star admiral taking command, its first aircraft carrier sailing around self-ruled Taiwan and a new aircraft carrier launched last month.With President Donald Trump promising a US shipbuilding spree and unnerving Beijing with his unpredictable approach on hot button issues including Taiwan and the South and East China Seas, China is pushing to narrow the gap with the U.S. Navy.Inspecting navy headquarters, Xi said the navy should "aim for the top ranks in the world", the Defence Ministry said in a statement about his visit."Building a strong and modern navy is an important mark of a top ranking global military," the ministry paraphrased Xi as saying.