The Sufi Route 2017: Folk, poetry, music festival to be held at Qutub Minar; headlined by AR Rahman

To be held at the Qutub Minar in Delhi on 18 November, The Sufi Route pays homage to the ancient roots of Sufi, folk and poetry

Neha Kirpal October 17, 2017 12:42:16 IST
The Sufi Route 2017: Folk, poetry, music festival to be held at Qutub Minar; headlined by AR Rahman

The Qutub Minar in Delhi has been chosen as the site of a Sufi festival. To be held at the heritage monument in the capital on 18 November, The Sufi Route aims to encourage and nurture a holistic alternate music experience and pay homage to the ancient roots of Sufi, folk and poetry. Bringing an authentic version of the genre to the stage are the event's promoters Friday Filmworks, organised and co-owned by INvision Entertainment and co-owned by Invloed Matrix.

The Sufi Route 2017 Folk poetry music festival to be held at Qutub Minar headlined by AR Rahman

AR Rahman will headline The Sufi Route

An occasion to foster genuine connections among all those who love Sufi music and art, this is the only time in recent memory that two ancient and culturally rich roots of Sufi music — Turkish Tasawuf and Indian Sufism — are blending together on this scale. The concert for peace will be also the first one ever at this historical monument. Bringing together acclaimed artistes such as the Nooran sisters, Mukhtiar Ali, Hans Raj Hans, Dhruv Sangari and a Sufi music concert by Turkish performers, the Whirling Dervish Ceremony, the finale of the show will be headlined by AR Rahman. 

One of the participating artists, Hans Raj Hans, said, “Coming from a Sufi background, it’s refreshing to see an initiative such as The Sufi Route take a beautiful shape. Music has the power to heal, and Sufi music more so. I am delighted to be a part of the journey that this festival will take us on.”

Sufi singer Dhruv Sangari, who is also performing at the festival, told Firstpost: “In an ever changing and unpredictable world, we need to constantly reconnect with our roots. Somewhere in us burns the question: Who am I? The music of the Sufis, faqirs and the wandering minstrels’ answers: I don’t know, but life is beautiful! Mystics say that music is the sound of creation itself and that is why it resonates within us all so deeply. As interpreters and performers of India’s rich devotional music heritage, I am indeed honoured to be a part of The Sufi Route and look forward to bringing our audiences the timeless poetry of beloved Sufi-Bhakti poet saints.”

The promoters of the festival have designed it to be age-agnostic and welcoming to anyone with an ear for alternative music and poetry. Shital Bhatia, co-founder of Friday Filmworks, said, “Anything presented in its true form always seems most beautiful — be it movies or music. Keeping it undiluted and real is what we are trying to do with The Sufi Route... reviving a heritage and presenting it to the modern audiences — while keeping it honest.” Created as a travelling, global platform, future plans for the festival include an encore in Turkey in the next edition, followed by concerts in the UK and UAE.

For tickets, click here.

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