Tanishq store in Gujarat's Gandhidham pastes handwritten apology on its door over withdrawn ad

The showroom manager and local police rubbished media reports that the showroom was attacked by some people angry with the Tanishq advertisement

Press Trust of India October 14, 2020 15:40:41 IST
Tanishq store in Gujarat's Gandhidham pastes handwritten apology on its door over withdrawn ad

A screen grab from the ad by Tanishq | YouTube

Gandhidham: A Tanishq jewellery showroom in Gandhidham town of Gujarat's Kutch district has put up a note on its door, apologising to Hindus in the district over the brand's controversial TV ad which has been withdrawn.

The handwritten note in Gujarati also condemned the TV commercial.

"We apologise to the Hindu community of Kutch on the shameful advertisement of Tanishq," the note read. It was pasted on the showroom's door on 12 October, and has since been removed, police said.

Photos of the apology note have gone viral on social media.

The showroom manager and local police rubbished media reports that the showroom was attacked by some people angry with the Tanishq advertisement.

"No such attack has taken place," said Superintendent of Police, Kutch-East, Mayur Patil.

The TV commercial featured a Muslim family preparing for an upcoming baby shower for their Hindu daughter-in-law.

Tanishq jewellery brand is a division of Titan company, promoted by the Tata Group in collaboration with the Tamil Nadu Industrial Development Corporation.

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