Supreme Court allows sale of Saridon, two other drugs for now after manufacturers challenge Centre's ban

Manufacturers of Saridon, Piriton and Dart had challenged the Centre's move to ban the drugs claiming that their composition could put people consuming them at risk.

FP Staff September 17, 2018 19:14:58 IST
Supreme Court allows sale of Saridon, two other drugs for now after manufacturers challenge Centre's ban

The Supreme Court on Monday allowed the sale of Saridon, Piriton and Dart for the time being after hearing a petition filed by the drug manufacturers. This comes just days after the Ministry of Health banned the manufacture for sale or distribution of 328 fixed-dose combination (FDC) drugs, including Saridon. The bench held that the stay on the Centre's notification will remain till it decided on the matter, according to NDTV.

Manufacturers challenged the government's decision to ban the drugs and, according to The Economic Times, argued that they have been making these combinations since before 1988. The companies also said that since the Supreme Court had earlier exempted 15 such combination drugs from the ban, the same exemptions should be extended to them, as well, the report quoted lawyers as saying.

Supreme Court allows sale of Saridon two other drugs for now after manufacturers challenge Centres ban

A view of Supreme Court of India. PTI

FDCs are two or more drugs combined in a fixed ratio into a single dose. In its notification, the government had said: "The Drugs Technical Advisory Board (DTAB) recommended, amongst other things, that there is no therapeutic justification for the ingredients contained in 328 FDCs, and that these FDCs may involve risk to human beings."

The All India Drug Action Network had hailed the Centre's decision and its convener Dr Gopal Dabade said the government has made the right decision, as the drugs "were indeed harmful" and "not prescribed in the textbooks of medicine".

In March 2016, the Centre had prohibited the manufacture, sale and distribution of 349 FDCs, but this was contested by the affected manufacturers in high courts and the Supreme Court.

Complying with the December 2017 Supreme Court judgment, the DTAB examined the matter and, in its report to the Centre, recommended prohibiting the FDCs, saying there was no therapeutic justification for the ingredients in the drugs, and that they could put people consuming them at risk.

Earlier, an expert committee appointed by the Centre, too, had made similar observations.

Considering the recommendations of DTAB and the expert committee, the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, through a gazette notification, prohibited the FDCs.

With inputs from agencies

Updated Date:

also read

Dubious BBC ‘documentary’ on PM Modi serves a crucial purpose in showing India an unflattering mirror
Opinion

Dubious BBC ‘documentary’ on PM Modi serves a crucial purpose in showing India an unflattering mirror

Interventionist forces will always find fertile ground to exploit and pose a challenge to India’s integrity

Canadian province decriminalises cocaine, heroin: Which countries allow possession of hard drugs?
World

Canadian province decriminalises cocaine, heroin: Which countries allow possession of hard drugs?

Canada’s province of British Columbia has undertaken a three-year experiment of decriminalising small amounts of drugs, including cocaine, heroin and MDMA. It is following other countries such as Portugal and Uruguay and even the US state of Oregon where some, if not all drugs, are allowed

In a major setback, Google loses bid to block India's Android antitrust ruling
World

In a major setback, Google loses bid to block India's Android antitrust ruling

A three-judge panel led by Chief Justice Chandrachud decided against blocking the CCI’s antitrust ruling that would require Google to change the way it markets Android in India. The Supreme Court also upheld the $161 million penalty imposed on Google.