How to read Budget 2014: Full text with analysis

Here is a look at how you should view the budget, with notes and annotations.

FP Staff July 10, 2014 16:06:36 IST

Finance Minister Arun Jaitley presented the first budget of the Modi government.

How to read Budget 2014 Full text with analysis

PTI

The budget in the finance minister's own words, should be seen as a statement of intent and directional change. "A roadmap budget" as he described it in an interview with Lok Sabha television.

Firstpost editor R Jagannathan in his analysis of the budget, said Jaitley has taken a gamble: he has gambled that he will boost growth to reduce his fiscal deficit, and not immediately cut expenditures it to bring finances in order.

Here is a look at how you should view the budget, with notes and annotations. (Click on the yellow markers for analysis and comments)

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