Kerala govt issues yellow alert for seven dams as state receives torrential rainfall; IMD says similar weather conditions expected for 4 days

The Kerala dams Neyyar Dam in Thiruvananthapuram district, Bhoothathankett in Ernakulam, Malankara in Idukki district, Moolathara in Palakkad, Karapuzha in Wayanad, Kuttiyadi in Kozhikkode and Pazhassi in Kannur are on yellow alert.

Asian News International June 25, 2020 20:36:28 IST
Kerala govt issues yellow alert for seven dams as state receives torrential rainfall; IMD says similar weather conditions expected for 4 days

Thiruvananthapuram: Due to the torrential rainfall in Kerala, the administration has issued yellow alert for seven dams across the state signalling that water could be released today.

The dams Neyyar Dam in Thiruvananthapuram district, Bhoothathankett in Ernakulam, Malankara in Idukki district, Moolathara in Palakkad, Karapuzha in Wayanad, Kuttiyadi in Kozhikkode and Pazhassi in Kannur are on yellow alert.

According to the India Meteorological Department (IMD), for the next four days, fairly widespread rainfall will also cover parts of south peninsular India. Kerala and Mahe to experience similar weather conditions on 26 and 27 June.

Updated Date:

also read

Kerala to ease COVID-19 lockdown restrictions; check what's allowed and what's not
India

Kerala to ease COVID-19 lockdown restrictions; check what's allowed and what's not

Chief Minister Pinarayi Vijayan said that there would be relaxation based on the average weekly Test Positivity Rate in the local self government bodies

India received 74% more rainfall than average in May 2021, second-highest since 1901: IMD
India

India received 74% more rainfall than average in May 2021, second-highest since 1901: IMD

The weather department attributed this record precipitation for the month of May to two back-to-back cyclones and western disturbances

Explainer: What makes Mumbai flood every monsoon? Clogged drains, rivers and receding mangroves likely reasons
India

Explainer: What makes Mumbai flood every monsoon? Clogged drains, rivers and receding mangroves likely reasons

Not only are Mumbai's rivers clogged, but the wetlands surrounding them are also practically non-existent, so when the rivers overflow they automatically lead to flooding in nearby localities