How Rahul Gandhi, Mamata Banerjee and Co are playing with millions of children's future over JEE, NEET

More than 150 academicians have written to Prime Minister Narendra Modi requesting him not to delay the examinations

Abhijit Majumder August 28, 2020 08:01:03 IST
How Rahul Gandhi, Mamata Banerjee and Co are playing with millions of children's future over JEE, NEET

In the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic, Rahul Gandhi spent a considerable amount of time and energy mocking the government over the lockdown, expressing grave concerns about the economy and offering the government gratuitous advice on opening up.

The same Rahul — as also many others in the Opposition like Mamata Banerjee — is now busy trying to stall and defer the Joint Entrance Examination (JEE) and the National Eligibility cum Entrance Test (NEET).

This despite India being at the threshold of Unlock 4, in which even metro rails are likely to resume. Most other modes of transport are running anyway.

In their political greed to create Mandal protests-like chaos for the government, the Congress social media supporters are plumbing new depths of fake news for emotional blackmail. Trying to pass stolen images as those of students cutting their wrists, for instance, without even caring about misleading youngsters to take such steps.

With this cheap and dangerous brand of politics, Rahul Gandhi is willing to push two entire batches of students into unmitigated disaster.

Nearly 2.5 million students take the NEET and the JEE. If the exam is not held even in September, it would mean a massive financial burden for the families of the students who will be appearing for the tests next year, let alone the psychological price of it.

It hurts students who have painstakingly prepared for the exams. If not held this year, next year there would be twice the number of students for the same number of seats. Imagine the kind of clamour that will ensue, the increased fees tutorials may charge taking advantage of the scramble, and the difficulty even meritorious students will have in securing a seat.

The unfortunate batch will face the same double-competition for campus and off-campus jobs when they graduate and a similar scramble for seats for higher studies.

Moreover, many students who are supposed to appear in the current year may cross their upper-age limit if the exams are postponed. They might be the worst hit.

Millions of parents would be forced to admit their children in private engineering colleges paying exorbitant fees because of the insane rush and chaos which a postponement or cancellation of examinations will trigger.

India is not in lockdown now, and with some precautions, exams of a few hours can be held across the country. Opposition leaders are playing cynical politics despite the National Testing Authority (NTA) assuring that parents need not worry about the exams being held during the pandemic because sufficient arrangements have been made to minimise the spread of virus and sanitise the centres. It has also clarified that 99 percent of students have got their 'first-choice-of-centre cities'.

State governments have also been sensitised to make it easy for students to appear for their examinations.

More than 150 academicians have written to Modi requesting him not to delay the examinations. "Any further delay in conducting the exams will result in waste of precious year for students. The dreams and future of our youth and students cannot be compromised at any cost. However, some are trying to play with the future of our students simply to propel their own political agenda and oppose the government," the letter said.

But the Congress' social media brigade will have none of that. An elaborate fake news campaign is afoot.

The politics that plays with impressionable minds and their futures is destined to consume itself in its fire. No good can come of it.

Views expressed are personal

Updated Date:

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