9 more inmates of Mumbai's Byculla jail admitted to JJ Hospital over suspected food poisoning; 104 prisoners affected in past 4 days

Nine more inmates of the Byculla prison in Mumbai have fallen sick due to suspected food poisoning, taking the total count of the affected prisoners, most of them women, to 104 over the last four days.

Press Trust of India July 23, 2018 13:06:12 IST
9 more inmates of Mumbai's Byculla jail admitted to JJ Hospital over suspected food poisoning; 104 prisoners affected in past 4 days

Mumbai: Nine more inmates of the Byculla prison in Mumbai have fallen sick due to suspected food poisoning, taking the total count of the affected prisoners, most of them women, to 104 over the last four days, an official said on Monday.

The nine prisoners were hospitalised on Sunday after they complained of stomach pain and dehydration, JJ Hospital's medical superintendent Dr Sanjay Surase said.

On 20 July, 81 inmates of the Byculla women's prison were admitted in the state-run JJ Hospital after they fell ill, with officials suspecting that food poisoning, contaminated water or reaction from a medicine as the reason behind their illness.

The number rose to 95 by Saturday, with more inmates complaining of similar symptoms.

9 more inmates of Mumbais Byculla jail admitted to JJ Hospital over suspected food poisoning 104 prisoners affected in past 4 days

Representational image. Reuters

While most of the prisoners were discharged, 15 inmates, including 13 women, were still in the hospital, Surase said.

Among the 13 women, two were pregnant, a police official said.

An investigation was on to ascertain the exact cause of the illness of the inmates, Surase said.

An anti-viral medicine was administered to all the prison inmates and staff on 19 July, after which some prisoners had complained of uneasiness, a top prison official had earlier said.

The prime accused in the Sheena Bora murder case, Indrani Mukerjea, who is lodged in the same prison, was not among those admitted to the hospital, the jail officials had said.

The dean of JJ Hospital, Mukund Tayade, had earlier said all those admitted had complained of vomiting, nausea and loose motions.

None of the patients was in a serious condition and they were responding well to treatment, he had added.

Samples of the drinking water and food given to the prisoners were being tested, an official had said.

The prison, which houses 312 inmates, was in the news last year when Manju Shetye (45), a convict, died after allegedly being beaten up by jail officials. Six officials were arrested in the case.

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