ICC Cricket World Cup 2019: MS Dhoni sporting Army insignia goes against rules; game's governing body right in intervening

A little research in ICC rulebook suggests that the apex cricket body is right in calling the shots by asking Dhoni, who serves as Honorary Lieutenant Colonel in the Parachute Regiment of Territorial Army, to remove the insignia

FirstCricket Staff, Jun 06, 2019 21:50:18 IST

MS Dhoni's wicket-keeping gloves came into limelight during India's first match against South Africa, which Virat Kohli and Co clinched by six wickets. During South Africa's innings, Dhoni was seen sporting the insignia of the Indian army on his pair of wicket-keeping gloves. The decision to wear the insignia by former Indian captain was welcomed by the fans on social media, for they saw it as a tribute to the Indian army.

However, the decision did not go down well with the ICC, who have asked the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) to get the badge removed, as it is against its regulations.

A little research in ICC rulebook suggests that the apex cricket body is right in calling the shots by asking Dhoni, who serves as Honorary Lieutenant Colonel in the Parachute Regiment of Territorial Army, to remove the insignia.

Under ICC's Clothing and Equipment Rules And Regulations, it is clearly stated that two manufacturer's designs or logos are allowed to be printed on the wicket-keeper's gloves. It is also written that 'No visible logos permitted other than those identified in the diagram'. ICC only allows a national logo, a commercial logo, an event logo, a manufacturer’s logo, a player's bat logo, a charity logo or a non-commercial logo to be printed on the kits. Army insignia does not fall under any category mentioned above.

The rule states, "Any clothing or equipment that does not comply with these Regulations is strictly prohibited. In particular, no Logo shall be permitted to be displayed on Cricket Clothing or Cricket Equipment, other than a National Logo, a Commercial Logo, an Event Logo, a Manufacturer's Logo, a Player's Bat Logo, a Charity Logo or a Non-Commercial Logo as provided in these Regulations. In addition, where any Match Official becomes aware of any clothing or equipment that does not comply with these Regulations, he shall be authorised to prevent the offending person from taking the field of play (or to order them from the field of play, if appropriate) until the non-compliant clothing or equipment is removed or appropriately covered up."

ICC has made a rule on players stating a personal message on the field as well, as per which no player team officials are permitted to wear, display or otherwise convey messages through arm bands or other items affixed to clothing or equipment without the governing body's permission.

Not to forget that in 2014, Moeen Ali was banned from wearing 'Save Gaza' and 'Free Palestine' wristbands during the third Test against India. ICC was stern on the rules back then despite facing the stiff criticism. The apex body is adamant on rules in Dhoni's case as well.

Two months ago when India had decided to wear camouflage caps on the field in respect of the CRPF Personnel killed in a terrorist attack in Pulwama, ICC did not have any issues as BCCI had taken permission for the same.

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Updated Date: Jun 07, 2019 08:07:29 IST


World Cup 2019 Points Table

Team p w l nr pts
New Zealand 5 4 0 1 9
England 5 4 1 0 8
Australia 5 4 1 0 8
India 4 3 0 1 7
Bangladesh 5 2 2 1 5
Sri Lanka 5 1 2 2 4
West Indies 5 1 3 1 3
South Africa 6 1 4 1 3
Pakistan 5 1 3 1 3
Afghanistan 5 0 5 0 0





Rank Team Points Rating
1 India 3631 113
2 New Zealand 2547 111
3 South Africa 2917 108
4 England 3663 105
5 Australia 2640 98
6 Sri Lanka 3462 94
Rank Team Points Rating
1 England 5720 124
2 India 5990 122
3 New Zealand 4121 114
4 South Africa 4647 111
5 Australia 4805 109
6 Pakistan 4107 93
Rank Team Points Rating
1 Pakistan 7365 283
2 England 4253 266
3 South Africa 4196 262
4 Australia 5471 261
5 India 7273 260
6 New Zealand 4056 254