Ahead of Fanney Khan, a throwback to films on fathers and daughters, from The Descendants to Piku

Shreya Paul

Aug,02 2018 13:49:27 IST

Both Bollywood and Hollywood have managed to produce iconic films that delve into intricacies of relationships. One particular favourite that always manages to melt audiences' hearts is that of a father-daughter bond. Generally considered the more protective parent, the father always tugs at hearts when he weeps, laughs, fights or scowls with or at his daughter.

Fanney Khan, releasing this Friday on 3 August, promises to explore one such relationship where the parent strives to go at lengths to fulfill his child's wishes. If the promos are any sign of the film, Anil Kapoor's character fits the bill of the quintessential doting father perfectly. Here is look at other films which manage to move audiences through their wonderful depictions of fathers and daughters.

Fanney Khan starring Anil Kapoor, Aishwarya Rai Bachchan and Rajkumar Rao is slated to release on 3 August.

Fanney Khan starring Anil Kapoor, Aishwarya Rai Bachchan and Rajkumar Rao is slated to release on 3 August.

Father of the Bride (1991)

George Banks can never leave our memories. Steve Martin's character of the doting-to-the-tee father had all of us at "Drive carefully. And don't forget to fasten your condom." Father of the Bride was adapted from the 1950 film of the same name. The utterly protective father, George is seen struggling to accept his 22-year-old Annie's (played by Kimberly Williams) sudden declaration of marriage. He whines, rationalises, rebukes and even conspires against would-be son-in-law Bryan (George Newburn), but to no avail. Martin manages to instill a father's insecurities into the character with ease. His comic timing is just a bonus. Even while George Banks hangs from Bryan's estate's window, trying to run away from the formidable dogs who catch his snooping, you feel for him. His ultimate reconciliation is not with Bryan but with himself and his own fatherly conscience. His farewell to the newly married couple somehow compels you to stand up, walk up to him and give him a bear hug.

Poster of Father of the Bride. Image from Facebook

Poster of Father of the Bride. Image from Facebook

The Descendants (2011)

Based on a 2007 novel, the film depicted George Clooney as Matthew "Matt" King, an attorney based out of Honolulu. Clooney's character of the father was anything but involved at the beginning of the film. Like many paternal figures, King was going ahead with his life oblivious of his two daughters' developments. Happy to have wife Elizabeth (Patricia Hastie) manage the rest, Matt was involved with his own career. A sudden accident changed the course of their life when Elizabeth was left comatose. Suddenly in the throes of fatherhood, King juggled between revelations of his wife's infidelity, his younger daughter's (Amara Miller) cries for attention masked behind her bullying attitude and his elder daughter's (Shailene Woodley) problem with substance abuse. Clooney managed to make his character grow into the 'father figure', learning yet hesitant, battered yet supportive. Winning a Golden Globe for his performance, Clooney managed to create memorable moments with King's glances, silences and utter shock at discovering his 'family' for the first time. The final scene of The Descendants, where King and his daughters are seen digging into buckets of ice-cream, almost charts the father's complete journey into the lives of his daughters.

A still from the film. Image from Facebook

A still from the film. Image from Facebook

Piku (2015)

Probably Bollywood's most defined work on a father-daughter relationship, Shoojit Sircar's Piku won audiences over with its subtleties. Amitabh Bachchan's Bhashkor Banerjee is cantankerous and annoying while Deepika Padukone's Piku is equally irritable and easily angered. Yet, the duo look after each other and supports each other unconditionally. Piku mothers Bhashkor, chooses to spend time with him discussing his bowel movements. Bhashkor reversely does not blink an eyelid before suggesting that Piku should explore more men in her life. Skeptical and critical, this duo is anything but perfect but both actors managed to portray the real people within their roles. Sircar manages to depict the mundane monotoneity and drudgery of old age in Bachchan with aplomb, almost celebrating the man's oddities. Piku manages to be the perfect daughter, all with her screaming, anger and ego. Padukone won the Filmfare Award for her role while Bachchan bagged a National Award for Bhashkor's portrayal.

A scene from the movie. Image from Facebook

A scene from the movie. Image from Facebook

Chaachi 420 (1997)

Kamal Hassan's take on Robin Williams' Mrs. Doubtfire created a rave in Bollywood. Hassan braved the unimaginable in a Marathi mulgi avatar of Chaachi, aka Jaiprakash Paswan. While Bollywood was busy depicting heroic machismo on screen, Hassan slipped into the dainty-but-tough shoes of Chaachi who was a world saviour of sorts. She fought off miscreants with her vegetable bag and boldly ousted a thieving maid, a territory which no man has ever ventured into. But what stood out was Jai and his daughter Bharti's (Fatima Sana Shaikh) endearing relationship. Even after the precocious Bharti discovers Jai's disguise, she decides to play along. From dancing to 'Macarena' at their house puja to ultimately winning his wife over, Bharti stands by Jai through thick and thin.

Jaiprakash aka Chaachi is seen with daughter Bharti

Jaiprakash aka Chaachi is seen with daughter Bharti. YouTube

The Croods (2013)

This DreamWorks film's success was already a no-brainer. Literally. The premise of a rock-age, almost neanderthalesque family taking baby steps into a modern human evolution, was just all heart. Nicholas Cage's patriarch father was overbearing, over-protective, over-angry and an over-thinker. The rebellious daughter (Emma Stone) was equally stubborn to get free. Yet, the Croods huddled together in their cave every night to protect themselves from animals and other dangers which might lurk outside, unknown and unannounced. In steps Guy, the guy who sweeps Eep (Stone) off her feet with his 'suave' animal shoes and his pet sloth belt. Grug (Cage) sees the influence that Guy gradually has on his family and specifically his 'poor' almost-enchanted daughter. The provider father undergoes his insecurity to ultimately accept Guy into the family.

The Croods poster. Image from Facebook

The Croods poster. Image from Facebook

Cheeni Kum (2007)

R Balki made a bold statement with Cheeni Kum. With Amitabh Bachchan's 64-year-old Buddhadev Gupta paired romantically opposite 34-year-old Nina Verma (Tabu), the film was filled with quirky dialogues. But the actual comic punch was brought in by veteran Paresh Rawal who played Nina's father Omprakash Verma. A Gandhian by nature, Omprakash found a mate in Gupta when Nina first brought her love interest home. From going for early morning walks to listening to pravachan, Omprakash considered Gupta his accomplice in old-age. "Iss umar mein toh shareer second-hand Ambassador ki tarah hota hai... kabhi carburetor mein kachra, kabhi suspension mein lafda ... toh baar baar servicing ke liye jaana padta hai" he tells Gupta innocently, little knowing what is to come next. Things take an awkward turn when Omprakash realises his daughter's interests with Gupta are far from platonic (to put it plainly). The Gandhian father goes into a severe spell of fasting and non-violent rebellion. Rawal brought in hilarious reactions and dialogues into the narrative, including a scene where he realises Gupta, his future son-in-law, is elder to him.

Cheeni Kum poster. Image from Facebook

Cheeni Kum poster. Image from Facebook

Updated Date: Aug 02, 2018 13:49 PM