articles by Arshia Dhar

long-reads

Aparna Sen and Madhabi Mukherjee on Satyajit Ray, the man, and his enduring legacy

On Satyajit Ray's 100th birth anniversary, his leading ladies Aparna Sen and Madhabi Mukherjee weigh in on the political significance of the man and his legacy, even 29 years since he breathed his last.

Lifestyle

Rumours of Spring: Farah Bashir's memoir is a stirring account of an unquiet adolescence spent in Kashmir

Bashir's debut work of literature also documents the changing political landscape of her home-state that turned into a militarised zone almost overnight, leaving her with inexplicable anxieties about everyday life.

Entertainment

CiNEmatters Ep 4 | Phijigee Mani sheds light on the insidious ways in which patriarchy governs life in Manipur

Firstpost presents CiNEmatters, a podcast examining cinema from the North East of India. In episode 4, we discuss 'Phijigee Mani' (2011), a National Award-winning Manipuri film.

Entertainment

CiNEmatters Ep 3 | In Reema Borah's film Bokul, a closer look at the plight of lives forced to reside on Assam's fringes

Firstpost presents CiNEmatters, a podcast examining cinema from the North East of India. In episode 3, we discuss 'Bokul' (2015), an Assamese film by Reema Borah.

Entertainment

CiNEmatters Ep 2 | How the Assamese film Maj Rati Keteki probes into the complex issue of identity in the state

Firstpost presents CiNEmatters, a podcast examining cinema from the North East of India. In episode 2, we discuss 'Maj Rati Keteki' (2017), an Assamese film by Santwana Bardoloi, starring Adil Hussain.

Entertainment

CiNEmatters Ep 1 | How the Bodo film Jwlwi: The Seed examines the plight of women in a volatile Assam

Firstpost presents CiNEmatters, a podcast examining cinema from the North East of India. In episode 1, we discuss 'Jwlwi: The Seed' (2019), a Bodo film by Rajni Basumatary.

Entertainment

Firstpost presents CiNEmatters, a new podcast on the cinema of North East India and its socio-cultural nuances

With every episode of CiNEmatters, Firstpost hopes to inch closer to understanding why entertainment from this part of the country continues to remain largely elusive, besides examining some of its most interesting, yet lesser-known offerings.

Arts & Culture

Amitav Ghosh on his book Jungle Nama, folk traditions: 'We have to find ways to make reading collaborative'

Through his new book Jungle Nama — written completely in verse, with artwork by Salman Toor — the writer wishes to uphold and celebrate folk traditions of storytelling by engaging with diverse mediums such as audiobooks, graphic novels and video-gaming.

Entertainment

Genus Pan movie review: Lav Diaz's film cuts down on runtime but not intensity of its scathing criticism of Filipino society

The Filipino film was screened at the 26th Kolkata International Film Festival earlier this month.

Entertainment

True Mothers review: Naomi Kawase's film explores nuances of motherhood but succumbs to its clichés

The film made its Indian premiere at the 26th Kolkata International Film Festival this year, and is Japan's official nominee for the Oscars 2021.

long-reads

How writer-director Mohit Priyadarshi made Kosa, a searing look at human rights violations in Chhattisgarh

The film made its Indian premiere at the 26th Kolkata International Film Festival in January 2021, after debuting internationally at UK's Raindance Festival in October last year.

long-reads

Remembering Moheener Ghoraguli, India's first rock band from Kolkata whose legacy thrives in resistance

Forty-five years since their formation, Moheener Ghoraguli — who likened themselves to a "movement" — continue to find resonance in the sound and art of budding artists not just in Bengal, but across India, with their songs being widely reprised and recreated.

Arts & Culture

Gulzar on A Poem a Day, his collection of translated poetry chronicling India's history since 1947

The compilation of translated poems by Gulzar has been over eight years in the making, traversing through the length and breadth of the country, with works of 279 poets in 34 languages featured in the book.

Entertainment

The AR Rahman interview | 'There are certain stories that need to be told because the world is divisive now'

AR Rahman, on being roped in as the ambassador for BAFTA Breakthrough's India chapter, talks about why Indian artists need to push the creative envelope, and how teaching music to children keeps him going.

Entertainment

Hansal Mehta on feeling 'empowered' after Scam 1992, and telling stories that do not pander to a mainstream audience

For Hansal Mehta, while the story of Harshad Mehta's aspirations was an extension to his upbringing in a middle class Gujarati family, Chhalaang was a project he undertook to have fun, and not overthink.

Arts & Culture

Neil Gaiman on making his readers ‘work’ through his prose, and why the fragility of the world inspires his writing

At the Tata Literature Live! The Mumbai LitFest, Neil Gaiman also talked about the pedagogical value of comics, and why he is uncomfortable with knowing where he will be three years from now.

Arts & Culture

Man Booker-winner Howard Jacobson on being born old, gloomy, and writing to make women laugh

At the Tata Literature Live! The Mumbai Litfest, Howard Jacobson also talks about being "anxious" on finding that people do not laugh at what was considered funny 30, 10 or even five years ago, and that this censorship comes at the cost of creators' vivacity.

Sports

Ramachandra Guha talks new book The Commonwealth of Cricket, his love for the sport, and its complex politics

The historian also recounts his brief stint as an administrator at the BCCI, where his resignation within six months of his appointment ruffled a few feathers in the cricketing fraternity.

Lifestyle

Thoughts on a conversation on sexual harassment in the arts, and making sense of traumas buried in the past

An asymmetrical distribution of power between the student and the teacher in the Indian arts — especially in the classical performing arts — makes this sphere vulnerable to incidents of sexual abuse, thereby rendering systemic reform not just crucial, but indispensable to the progress of the disciplines.

Lifestyle

How the silence of RK Laxman's Common Man primed India to focus on the corruption ailing its democracy

By following the Common Man's line of vision, you see what should be seen. He defiantly refuses to distract, underlining how it is not always necessary to add to the din; how sometimes, it is okay to sit back and soak it all up for the sake of posterity.