Zika spread, impact 'scarier than we initially thought' - U.S. health official | Reuters

WASHINGTON The spread and impact of the Zika virus is wider than initially anticipated and the first vaccine candidate for the virus should be available in September, U.S. health officials said on Monday

Reuters April 12, 2016 00:31:57 IST
Zika spread, impact 'scarier than we initially thought' - U.S. health official
| Reuters

Zika spread impact scarier than we initially thought  US health official
 Reuters

WASHINGTON The spread and impact of the Zika virus is wider than initially anticipated and the first vaccine candidate for the virus should be available in September, U.S. health officials said on Monday.

Dr. Anne Schuchat, a deputy director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, told reporters the type of mosquito in which the virus is carried is present in more U.S. states than initially thought. She said what authorities are learning about the virus is "scarier than we initially thought."

Anthony Fauci, director of the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said at a White House briefing the first Zika vaccine candidate should be available in September.

(Reporting by Clarece Polke; Editing by Tim Ahmann)

This story has not been edited by Firstpost staff and is generated by auto-feed.

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