Watch: Israel may soon shed light on 'stolen babies' mystery

Activists and family members claim thousands of babies were stolen in the years after Israel became a country in 1948.

AFP July 20, 2016 16:16:17 IST

Today, Shoshana Dugma lives in the Israeli town of Elyakhin. She came to the country from Yemen in 1950, first settling in a refugee camp with her family. And she stills remembers the morning, 66 years ago, when she went to feed her newborn at the camp's nursery and discovered she had vanished.

Activists and family members claim thousands of babies were stolen in the years after Israel became a country in 1948. They say hospitals were often complicit in giving them away to welfare officials who would then have them adopted by Jewish families of Western origin. A commission of inquiry formed in 1995 rejected claims of baby theft.
The materials pertaining to the cases remain classified for privacy reasons.

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