Venice council hall flooded minutes after rejecting climate change bill; pictures of room go viral on social media

As per a Facebook post by Andrea Zanoni, the deputy chairman of the council’s environment committee, the Venice council hall got flooded just two minutes after the bill was rejected.

FP Trending November 17, 2019 17:05:08 IST
Venice council hall flooded minutes after rejecting climate change bill; pictures of room go viral on social media
  • Veneto regional council, located on Venice's Grand Canal, was flooded for the first time in its history on Tuesday night just moments after it rejected a bill to combat tackle alarming changes in the climate.

  • As per reports, Tuesday night, when the climate change bill was being debated by the councilors, Venice experienced its worst flooding since 1966.

  • According to Andrea Zanoni, deputy chairman of the environment committee, the room got flooded just two minutes after the bill was rejected.

Veneto's regional council, located on Venice's Grand Canal, was flooded for the first time in its history on Tuesday night, just minutes after it rejected a bill to tackle alarming changes in the climate.

According to a report by The Guardian, on Tuesday night, when the climate change bill was being debated by the councilors, Venice experienced its worst flooding since 1966.

As per a Facebook post by Andrea Zanoni, the deputy chairman of the council’s environment committee, the room got flooded just two minutes after the bill was rejected.

His post also accompanied pictures of the flooded room, which are now all over the social media. His post read, "Ironically, the chamber was flooded two minutes after the majority parties rejected our proposals to tackle climate change."

The historic Italian city has been brought to its knees this week for the first time in 50 years by the highest tides. Venice was braced on a Sunday for an unprecedented third major flooding in less than a week.

The crisis has prompted the government to release 20 million euros ($22 million) in funds to tackle the devastation.

Residents whose houses have been hit are eligible for up to 5,000 euros in immediate government aid, while restaurant and shop owners can receive up to 20,000 euros and apply for more later.
Most of the city's cash machines were no longer working because of the water, making life even more difficult for tourists and Venetians.

Older residents who remember the infamous "acqua alta" of 1966, when the water rose to a level of 1.94 metres, say they have not seen such frequent flooding before.

This is how Venice looks right now:

With inputs from AFP

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