Venezuela government investigates Guaido over photo with suspected Colombian criminals

CARACAS (Reuters) - Venezuela's state prosecutor's office said on Friday it would open an investigation into opposition leader Juan Guaido after the interior minister presented photos on state television showing Guaido in the company of two suspected members of a Colombian drug-trafficking group. Guaido on Friday said the two men had asked to take a photo with him when he secretly crossed into Colombia from Venezuela in February via an informal border route after a Venezuelan court had barred him from leaving the country. He denied knowing who the men were.

Reuters September 14, 2019 03:12:31 IST
Venezuela government investigates Guaido over photo with suspected Colombian criminals

Venezuela government investigates Guaido over photo with suspected Colombian criminals

CARACAS (Reuters) - Venezuela's state prosecutor's office said on Friday it would open an investigation into opposition leader Juan Guaido after the interior minister presented photos on state television showing Guaido in the company of two suspected members of a Colombian drug-trafficking group.

Guaido on Friday said the two men had asked to take a photo with him when he secretly crossed into Colombia from Venezuela in February via an informal border route after a Venezuelan court had barred him from leaving the country.

He denied knowing who the men were. "We didn't ask for their criminal record to take a photo," he told reporters in Caracas.

Venezuelan Interior Minister Nestor Reverol said on state television that the two men were leaders of a "Colombian paramilitary organization" called the Rastrojos. Reverol said he would send the photos as evidence to the state prosecutor's office, which later opened the investigation.

Colombian police sources confirmed they were members of the Rastrojos, a criminal group made up of ex-paramilitaries that engages in drug trafficking across the country, including along the Venezuelan border.

Guaido crossed into Colombia before a U.S.-backed attempt on Feb. 23 to send trucks loaded with humanitarian aid into Venezuela from the Colombian border town of Cucuta. Maduro, however, had ordered the border's closure and told the military to block the aid's entry.

At the time, it was not clear how Guaido had crossed the border. He appeared at an aid concert by Cucuta on Feb. 22 dressed in the same clothes as he was wearing in the photo with the two men.

Guaido assumed an interim presidency in January after denouncing Maduro as illegitimate for securing a second term last year in an election widely viewed as fraudulent. Most western nations now recognise Guaido as Venezuela's rightful leader, though Maduro labels him a coupmongering U.S. puppet.

(Reporting by Corina Pons and Deisy Buitrago; Writing by Angus Berwick; Editing by Daniel Wallis)

This story has not been edited by Firstpost staff and is generated by auto-feed.

Updated Date:

TAGS:

also read

Pulitzer Prize-winning photojournalist Danish Siddiqui killed in Afghanistan: Politicans, journalists pay tributes
India

Pulitzer Prize-winning photojournalist Danish Siddiqui killed in Afghanistan: Politicans, journalists pay tributes

The Pulitzer prize winner, who was in Kandahar covering operations against Taliban, was killed when he was riding along with the Afghan Special Forces

Indian photojournalist Danish Siddiqui killed during assignment in Afghanistan's Kandahar province
India

Indian photojournalist Danish Siddiqui killed during assignment in Afghanistan's Kandahar province

Siddiqui had also covered the 2020 Delhi riots, COVID-19 pandemic, Nepal earthquake in 2015 and the protests in Hong Kong

Danish Siddiqui's passing is a reminder of the high price one pays for showing the truth
India

Danish Siddiqui's passing is a reminder of the high price one pays for showing the truth

Danish's photographs were not just documentation, but the work of someone who went down to eye-level, as they say in photographic parlance.