UN finds 'systemic failures' in its response to Rohingya crisis, report says 'all parties' failed to convey grave human rights violations

The report says that while 'it is difficult to assign responsibility for systemic failures,' there is a shared responsibility 'on the part of all parties involved' in not 'conveying more forcefully the United Nations' principled concerns regarding grave human rights violations.'

Agence France-Presse June 18, 2019 10:53:03 IST
UN finds 'systemic failures' in its response to Rohingya crisis, report says 'all parties' failed to convey grave human rights violations
  • United Nations experienced 'systemic failures' in its handling of the situation in Myanmar leading up to the 2017 mass exodus of Rohingya, a UN report said

  • The finding came after UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres in February ordered the internal review of the world body's operations in Myanmar

  • UN officials in Myanmar were accused of ignoring warning signs of the attacks against the Rohingya, a Muslim minority

The United Nations experienced "systemic failures" in its handling of the situation in Myanmar leading up to the 2017 mass exodus of Rohingya, a UN report said on Monday.

The finding came after UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres in February ordered the internal review of the world body's operations in Myanmar after its officials in the country were accused of ignoring warning signs of the attacks against the Rohingya, a Muslim minority.

Today some 7,40,000 Rohingya are living in camps in Bangladesh after fleeing Myanmar's northern Rakhine state during a 2017 military campaign the UN has described as ethnic cleansing.

The report says that while "it is difficult to assign responsibility for systemic failures," there is a shared responsibility "on the part of all parties involved" in not "conveying more forcefully the United Nations' principled concerns regarding grave human rights violations."

UN finds systemic failures in its response to Rohingya crisis report says all parties failed to convey grave human rights violations

File photo of Rohingya refugees in camps. AP

Some of the criticism of the UN has focused on allegations that the world body's then-resident coordinator, Renata Lok-Dessallien, downplayed concerns about worsening abuses against the Rohingya in favor of prioritizing economic cooperation with Myanmar's government. The UN has denied those claims.

But the 36-page report authored by veteran Guatemalan diplomat Gert Rosenthal and shared with UN member states denounces a "dynamic of divisions rather than cohesion within the UN system", "the absence of a clear and unified strategy" and shortcomings of "systematic and unified analysis from the field."

'Unease' over rights

Rosenthal wrote that the UN "needs to improve, systematize and share the gathering of data, information and analysis of events on the ground in real time," and if there are "diverse interpretations coming from different quarters," they should be shared and efforts made to understand them.

Among the causes of the UN's failures, the diplomat notes "the initial fascination on the part of the international community with the political transition, based in no small part on the almost legendary status that Aung San Suu Kyi had reached," referring to the country's civilian leader.

He said then-United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra'ad Al Hussein most consistently called out the rights violations taking place but this led to "some unease among those in the UN who favored the 'quiet diplomacy' approach."

Asked on Monday about the report, UN spokesman Stephane Dujarric said Guterres has accepted the recommendations "and is committed to implementing them so as to improve the performance of the United Nations system."

But Louis Charbonneau, United Nations director at Human Rights Watch, said the UN needs to hold accountable "UN officials most responsible for ignoring ethnic cleansing in Myanmar." "UN 'lessons-learned' reports about its failure to act in the face of mass atrocities have become almost routine," he said.

 

Updated Date:

also read

Over 3 million Afghan children under five could suffer from acute malnutrition by year end, warn UN agencies
World

Over 3 million Afghan children under five could suffer from acute malnutrition by year end, warn UN agencies

Acute food insecurity is affecting 14 million people in Afghanistan who are without reliable access to water, food and basic health and nutrition services, following years of conflict

Taliban agrees to restart polio vaccinations across Afghanistan, says World Health Organisation
World

Taliban agrees to restart polio vaccinations across Afghanistan, says World Health Organisation

The Taliban had since 2018 barred UN-organised vaccination teams from door-to-door campaigns in parts of Afghanistan under their control over fears of spy infiltration

Pakistan may remain on 'grey list' till FATF's next session in April 2022, says French media report
World

Pakistan may remain on 'grey list' till FATF's next session in April 2022, says French media report

The FATF is an inter-governmental body established in 1989 to combat money laundering, terrorist financing and other related threats to the integrity of the international financial system