U.S. lawmakers want more information from Trump son-in-law Kushner for Russia probe | Reuters

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The leaders of the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee said on Thursday they had not received information they requested from President Donald Trump’s son-in-law, Jared Kushner, including emails, phone records and documents related to communications with former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn.

Reuters November 17, 2017 02:16:53 IST
U.S. lawmakers want more information from Trump son-in-law Kushner for Russia probe | Reuters

US lawmakers want more information from Trump soninlaw Kushner for Russia probe  ReutersWASHINGTON (Reuters) - The leaders of the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee said on Thursday they had not received information they requested from President Donald Trump’s son-in-law, Jared Kushner, including emails, phone records and documents related to communications with former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn. White House Senior adviser Jared Kushner sits behind U.S. President Donald Trump during a cabinet meeting at the White House in Washington, U.S., November 1, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque In a letter to Abbe Lowell, Kushner’s attorney, Senators Chuck Grassley and Dianne Feinstein requested all those documents, as well as transcripts from interviews with other committees. Among requested documents, which they described as known to exist but not provided to the Judiciary Committee, were the phone records and emails to Kushner concerning WikiLeaks and a “Russian backdoor overture and dinner invite,” both forwarded by Kushner. WikiLeaks released emails stolen from Democrats that helped Trump’s campaign against his Democratic rival, Hillary Clinton. Grassley is the chairman and Feinstein the top Democrat on the Judiciary Committee, which is conducting one of the main congressional investigations of Russian involvement in the 2016 U.S. election and allegations of collusion between Trump’s campaign and Moscow. Both Trump and the Russian government deny such activities. Flynn, who had been a Trump campaign adviser, was fired from his post as national security adviser after misleading Vice President Mike Pence about the extent of his conversations with Russian Ambassador Sergei Kislyak last year. The letter to Lowell said the committee requested the documents on Oct. 18, and some, but not all the material requested, was provided on Nov. 3. “We appreciate your voluntary cooperation with the Committee’s investigation, but the production appears to have been incomplete,” Grassley and Feinstein wrote. Lowell and a White House spokesman did not immediately respond to requests for comment. Kushner is among numerous Trump advisers who have acknowledged interaction with Russian intermediaries.

This story has not been edited by Firstpost staff and is generated by auto-feed.

Updated Date:

TAGS:

also read

Greek police clash with protesters in rally against mandatory vaccinations
World

Greek police clash with protesters in rally against mandatory vaccinations

ATHENS (Reuters) - Greek police used teargas and water cannon to disperse people who had gathered in central Athens on Saturday to protest against mandatory COVID-19 vaccinations. More than 4,000 people rallied outside the Greek parliament for a third time this month to oppose mandatory inoculations for some workers, such as healthcare and nursing staff.

Two Turkish soldiers killed in attack in northern Syria
World

Two Turkish soldiers killed in attack in northern Syria

ISTANBUL (Reuters) - Two Turkish soldiers were killed and two were wounded in an attack on their armoured vehicle in northern Syria, and Turkish forces immediately launched retaliatory fire, Turkey's defence ministry said on Saturday. "Our punitive fire against terrorist positions is continuing," the statement on Twitter on said. It did not specify where the attack occurred, but media reports said it was in the al-Bab area.

Brazilians take to streets again to demand Bolsonaro's impeachment
World

Brazilians take to streets again to demand Bolsonaro's impeachment

By Marcelo Rochabrun SAO PAULO (Reuters) - Protesters took to the streets in several Brazilian cities on Saturday to demand the impeachment of far-right President Jair Bolsonaro, whose popularity has fallen in recent weeks amid corruption scandals against the backdrop of the pandemic. This week, news broke that Brazil's defense ministry told congressional leadership that next year's elections would not take place without amending the country's electronic voting system to include a paper trail of each vote. Bolsonaro has suggested several times without evidence that the current system is prone to fraud, allegations that Brazil's government has denied