U.S. Congressman Nadler becomes woozy at briefing, says he feels better

By Peter Szekely NEW YORK (Reuters) - U.S. Representative Jerrold Nadler became woozy and appeared almost to faint during a press briefing on Friday with New York Mayor Bill de Blasio, but the congressman said soon after that he had been dehydrated and was now feeling better

Reuters May 25, 2019 01:06:23 IST
U.S. Congressman Nadler becomes woozy at briefing, says he feels better

US Congressman Nadler becomes woozy at briefing says he feels better

By Peter Szekely

NEW YORK (Reuters) - U.S. Representative Jerrold Nadler became woozy and appeared almost to faint during a press briefing on Friday with New York Mayor Bill de Blasio, but the congressman said soon after that he had been dehydrated and was now feeling better.

During the late morning briefing in Manhattan about the city's planned implementation of speed traffic cameras, de Blasio stopped speaking, turned to Nadler who was slumping over in the chair next to him and offered him some water.

"You seem a little dehydrated," the mayor said. "You OK?"

Nadler responded, "No," but declined the mayor's offer of water and put his hand to his head.

De Blasio later told reporters that the congressman's condition improved markedly after receiving water, juice and treatment from emergency medical personnel.

"He got more energetic with every passing minute," the mayor said "He was starting to talk to everyone, joke around, answer a whole bunch of medical questions."

Nadler, 71, who has represented his New York City district in Congress since 1992, chairs the House Judiciary Committee which is currently duelling with the White House over Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election.

The New York Democrat underwent stomach-reduction surgery 17 years ago when he weighed 338 pounds (153 kg) and shed more than 60 pounds from his 5-foot, 4-inch (1.6-meter) frame within months, according to media reports.

Nadler himself said he had felt dehydrated, which he blamed on the warm temperature of the school building where the briefing was held, adding that his condition improved quickly.

"Appreciate everyone's concern," Nadler wrote on Twitter at about 1 p.m. EDT (1700 GMT). "Was very warm in the room this morning, was obviously dehydrated and felt a bit ill. Glad to receive fluids and am feeling much better."

Asked if Nadler was taken to a hospital, spokesman Daniel Schwarz replied by email that, "He is responsive and receiving a check-up."

(Reporting by Peter Szekely; editing by Susan Thomas and G Crosse)

This story has not been edited by Firstpost staff and is generated by auto-feed.

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