U.S. budget negotiations advance but no deal yet

By Richard Cowan WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. Congress and White House negotiators spent hours in closed-door meetings trying to reach a two-year deal on federal spending but could not yet wrap up an agreement, Senate Democratic Leader Chuck Schumer said on Tuesday.

Reuters May 22, 2019 05:08:36 IST
U.S. budget negotiations advance but no deal yet

US budget negotiations advance but no deal yet

By Richard Cowan

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. Congress and White House negotiators spent hours in closed-door meetings trying to reach a two-year deal on federal spending but could not yet wrap up an agreement, Senate Democratic Leader Chuck Schumer said on Tuesday.

Following an afternoon session, Schumer indicated to reporters that the non-defence side of the budget ledger was a sticking point.

"We're trying to come to an agreement, and one of the biggest questions is how to fund all of the needs of the middle class on the domestic side," he said, adding that no more meetings were scheduled for Tuesday.

Republicans have consistently fought for higher defence spending and paring back non-defence accounts.

Without a bipartisan deal on new budget caps, military spending would drop to around $576 billion in the fiscal year starting Oct. 1, a $70.8 billion reduction from this year.

Non-defence spending would fall to $543.2 billion, a nearly $53.8 billion cut from this year.

An increase in U.S. Treasury Department borrowing authority also was under discussion in the closed-door sessions.

Earlier in the day, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, a Republican, told reporters that he had hoped to wrap up the negotiations by day's end.

"The agreement would be a two-year caps deal, which would allow us to go forward with some semblance at least of a regular appropriations process. It would also in all likelihood include the debt ceiling."

Treasury later this year is expected to exhaust its statutory borrowing authority amid heavy deficit spending by the federal government.

The four top Democrats and Republicans in the House of Representatives and Senate, along with Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and Acting White House Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney, met for about three hours during two sessions in the Capitol. Congressional leaders said progress was made.

After a morning session, Schumer said it remains to be seen whether Republican President Donald Trump would back a pact if one emerges.

In the past, Trump at the last minute has criticized some arrangements that congressional negotiators thought had his support.

Failure to reach a bipartisan deal on spending could set up another showdown between Congress and the White House in September like the ones late last year and early this year that resulted in partial government shutdowns.

And without legislation to extend Treasury's borrowing authority, Washington would be flirting with a U.S. default on its debt, shaking global financial markets.

Even with an agreement for the next two years on overall spending levels, the House and Senate still have to pass a series of appropriations bills to carry out the accord.

(Reporting Richard Cowan, Amanda Becker and Doina Chiacu; editing by Mohammad Zargham and Jonathan Oatis)

This story has not been edited by Firstpost staff and is generated by auto-feed.

Updated Date:

TAGS:

also read

Pulitzer Prize-winning photojournalist Danish Siddiqui killed in Afghanistan: Politicans, journalists pay tributes
India

Pulitzer Prize-winning photojournalist Danish Siddiqui killed in Afghanistan: Politicans, journalists pay tributes

The Pulitzer prize winner, who was in Kandahar covering operations against Taliban, was killed when he was riding along with the Afghan Special Forces

Indian photojournalist Danish Siddiqui killed during assignment in Afghanistan's Kandahar province
India

Indian photojournalist Danish Siddiqui killed during assignment in Afghanistan's Kandahar province

Siddiqui had also covered the 2020 Delhi riots, COVID-19 pandemic, Nepal earthquake in 2015 and the protests in Hong Kong

Danish Siddiqui's passing is a reminder of the high price one pays for showing the truth
India

Danish Siddiqui's passing is a reminder of the high price one pays for showing the truth

Danish's photographs were not just documentation, but the work of someone who went down to eye-level, as they say in photographic parlance.