Trudeau government delayed sharing oil spill reports with indigenous community, court hears

By Moira Warburton VANCOUVER, British Columbia (Reuters) - The Canadian government delayed sharing critical documents about spill risks related to expanding its oil pipeline, in some cases waiting until after the conclusion of consultations with indigenous communities, a court heard on Tuesday. The Squamish Nation received government reports on the impact of marine spills from an expanded Trans Mountain pipeline only after the government's consultations with its officials had concluded in June, Michelle Bradley, a lawyer for Squamish said in the Federal Court of Appeal in Vancouver. When it did receive the reports - peer reviews of indigenous groups' expert reports - Squamish discovered too late for discussion that the government's own scientists agreed with the communities that much is not understood about how spilled bitumen would react in bodies of water

Reuters December 18, 2019 02:11:46 IST
Trudeau government delayed sharing oil spill reports with indigenous community, court hears

Trudeau government delayed sharing oil spill reports with indigenous community court hears

By Moira Warburton

VANCOUVER, British Columbia (Reuters) - The Canadian government delayed sharing critical documents about spill risks related to expanding its oil pipeline, in some cases waiting until after the conclusion of consultations with indigenous communities, a court heard on Tuesday.

The Squamish Nation received government reports on the impact of marine spills from an expanded Trans Mountain pipeline only after the government's consultations with its officials had concluded in June, Michelle Bradley, a lawyer for Squamish said in the Federal Court of Appeal in Vancouver.

When it did receive the reports - peer reviews of indigenous groups' expert reports - Squamish discovered too late for discussion that the government's own scientists agreed with the communities that much is not understood about how spilled bitumen would react in bodies of water.

The hearing began on Monday and is scheduled to last through Wednesday. The court agreed in September to consider concerns from four indigenous groups that the government's consultations this year were insufficient.

The legal challenge is the latest setback for Trans Mountain, which is one of several stalled pipeline expansions proposed to ease congested export channels.

"Information was disclosed far too late," Bradley said. "It took place in a flurry of activity at the very end or even after the consultative process."

The Canadian government is scheduled to argue its position later on Tuesday.

The Trans Mountain expansion would nearly triple capacity to move 890,000 barrels of oil per day from Alberta to a port terminal near Vancouver. Construction continues despite the court challenge.

(Reporting by Moira Warburton in Vancouver; writing by Rod Nickel in Winnipeg, Manitoba; Editing by Dan Grebler)

This story has not been edited by Firstpost staff and is generated by auto-feed.

Updated Date:

TAGS:

Find latest and upcoming tech gadgets online on Tech2 Gadgets. Get technology news, gadgets reviews & ratings. Popular gadgets including laptop, tablet and mobile specifications, features, prices, comparison.

also read

Shelves empty, schools shut as Madrid struggles with record snowfall
World

Shelves empty, schools shut as Madrid struggles with record snowfall

By Cristina Sanchez and Belén Carreño MADRID (Reuters) - Schools in Madrid remained shut, some supermarkets ran out of fresh produce and few cars were on the streets on Monday as officials urged people to stay home after a huge snow storm hit the Spanish capital and several regions over the weekend. However, most flights and trains, including the high-speed link to Barcelona, have resumed operations. While many people enjoyed the rare snowfall by skiing in the centre of Madrid and holding mass snowball fights, a further cold spell was set to turn the snow into ice this week and authorities rushed to clear more streets.

BioNTech lifts 2021 COVID-19 vaccine output target to 2 billion doses
World

BioNTech lifts 2021 COVID-19 vaccine output target to 2 billion doses

By Ludwig Burger FRANKFURT (Reuters) - Pfizer Inc's partner BioNTech SE has boosted the 2021 delivery target for their COVID-19 vaccine to 2 billion doses, up from 1.3 billion previously, as they add new production lines and as more doses can be extracted per vial. Special syringes known as low dead space syringes allow for extraction of six vaccine doses from a standard vial, instead of the usual five, avoiding wasting unused liquid left in a syringe. That would result in 1 billion people getting the designated two-dose regimen, BioNTech said on Monday in a presentation for the annual JP Morgan healthcare conference being held virtually this year due to the coronavirus pandemic.

WHO says it was notified of new COVID-19 variant found in Japan
World

WHO says it was notified of new COVID-19 variant found in Japan

GENEVA (Reuters) - The World Health Organization said on Monday it had been notified by Japan of a new variant of the coronavirus discovered there. Japan's health ministry said on Sunday it had detected a new coronavirus variant in four travellers from Brazil's Amazonas state.