Third Canadian detained in China amid Huawei dispute

By David Ljunggren OTTAWA (Reuters) - A third Canadian has been detained in China following the arrest of a Chinese technology executive in Vancouver, a Canadian government official said on Wednesday amid a diplomatic dispute also involving the United States. The detentions of the Canadians followed the Dec.

Reuters December 20, 2018 02:06:58 IST
Third Canadian detained in China amid Huawei dispute

Third Canadian detained in China amid Huawei dispute

By David Ljunggren

OTTAWA (Reuters) - A third Canadian has been detained in China following the arrest of a Chinese technology executive in Vancouver, a Canadian government official said on Wednesday amid a diplomatic dispute also involving the United States.

The detentions of the Canadians followed the Dec. 1 arrest in Vancouver of Meng Wanzhou, chief financial officer of the Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei Technologies Co Ltd. [HWT.UL], at the request of the United States, which is engaged in a trade war with Canada.

The Canadian official, who spoke on the condition of not being identified, said there is no reason to believe the latest detention is linked to the previous arrests. The official gave no details of the latest incident.

Last week two Canadians - former diplomat Michael Kovrig and businessman Michael Spavor - were detained by China amid the diplomatic quarrel triggered by Meng's arrest.

The Canadian government has said several times it saw no explicit link between the arrest of Meng, the daughter of Huawei’s founder, and the detentions of Kovrig and Spavor. But Beijing-based Western diplomats and former Canadian diplomats have said they believed the detentions were a "tit-for-tat" reprisal by China.

Meng is accused by the United States of misleading multinational banks about Iran-linked transactions, putting the banks at risk of violating U.S. sanctions. She was released on bail in Vancouver, where she owns two homes, while waiting to learn if she will be extradited to the United States. She is due in court on Feb. 6.

TRUMP COMMENTS

U.S. President Donald Trump told Reuters last week he might intervene in the case if it would serve national security interests or help close a trade deal with China.

The comments upset Canada, which warned the United States against politicizing extradition cases.

A source with direct knowledge of the situation said senior officials at the Canadian Foreign Ministry had held many meetings about the detainees but that a formal task force had yet to be created.

"At this point, Canada is trying to buy time by stressing it has a rules-based order and an independent judiciary," said the source, who declined to be identified because of the sensitivity of the situation.

A second source said Canada was concerned that the detainees were in the hands of the powerful security authorities.

"Even if there were voices of reason in the Chinese system saying, 'Are you crazy? The Canadian government cannot order a judge to release Ms. Meng,' the security voices are going to trump them," the source said.

The last time Canadians were detained in China for security reasons was in 2014 when Kevin and Julia Garratt, who ran a coffee shop in northeastern China, were held near the border with North Korea. She was released and left the country while her husband was charged with spying and stealing state secrets before being released and deported two years later.

The arrest of the Garratts came shortly after Chinese businessman Su Bin was picked up on a U.S. warrant in Canada.

If extradited to the United States, Meng would face charges of conspiracy to defraud multiple financial institutions, with a maximum sentence of 30 years for each charge.

China has protested her arrest to the U.S. ambassador and said Washington should withdraw its arrest warrant. Last week, U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said the detention of the first two Canadians was unlawful and called for their release.

Huawei is the world’s biggest supplier of telecoms network equipment and second biggest smartphone seller. The United States has been looking since at least 2016 into whether Huawei shipped U.S.-origin products to Iran and other countries in violation of U.S. export and sanctions laws, Reuters reported in April.

(Reporting by Ben Blanchard, Philip Wen and Christian Shepherd in Beijing, Allison Martell in Toronto and David Ljunggren in Ottawa; Writing by Bill Trott; Editing by Bernadette Baum and Alistair Bell)

This story has not been edited by Firstpost staff and is generated by auto-feed.

Updated Date:

TAGS:

Find latest and upcoming tech gadgets online on Tech2 Gadgets. Get technology news, gadgets reviews & ratings. Popular gadgets including laptop, tablet and mobile specifications, features, prices, comparison.

also read

Mexico, India, Ireland, Norway elected to U.N. Security Council, one seat still open
World

Mexico, India, Ireland, Norway elected to U.N. Security Council, one seat still open

UNITED NATIONS (Reuters) - Mexico, India, Ireland and Norway were elected to the United Nations Security Council on Wednesday, but the 193 U.N. member states must return on Thursday to continue voting to fill one more vacant seat after there was no clear winner. Canada lost out to Ireland and Norway in a hotly contested election that included Ireland enlisting the help of U2 singer Bono and taking U.N.

WHO halts trial of hydroxychloroquine in COVID-19 patients
World

WHO halts trial of hydroxychloroquine in COVID-19 patients

GENEVA/LONDON (Reuters) - The World Health Organization said on Wednesday that testing of the malaria drug hydroxychloroquine in its large multi-country trial of treatments for COVID-19 patients had been halted after results from other trials showed no benefit. "The hydroxychloroquine arm of the SOLIDARITY trial has been stopped," WHO expert Ana Maria Henao-Restrepo told a news briefing. (Reporting by Mike Shields, Emma Farge and Kate Kelland, editing by Peter Graff and Kevin Liffey)

Atlanta police officer charged with murder in shooting death of Rayshard Brooks
World

Atlanta police officer charged with murder in shooting death of Rayshard Brooks

By Rich McKay and Nathan Layne (Reuters) - A Georgia county prosecutor on Wednesday announced that a fired Atlanta police officer has been charged with felony murder in the shooting death of Rayshard Brooks in the parking lot of a fast-food restaurant last week. The death of the 27-year-old Brooks - another in a long line of African-Americans killed by police - further heightened racial concerns in the United States at a time of national soul-searching over racism and police brutality. Garrett Rolfe, the white officer who shot Brooks on June 12 and was fired the next day after surveillance video showed his actions, faces 11 charges including felony murder and assault with a deadly weapon, Fulton County District Attorney Paul Howard told a news conference in Atlanta