Texas Republicans say sorry for likening Hindu deity Ganesha to party's elephant symbol amid Congressional race featuring Indian-American Sri Preston Kulkarni

Republican leaders in suburban Houston have apologized for an advertisement likening the Hindu deity Ganesha to the GOP's elephant symbol amid a congressional race featuring an Indian-American Democrat.

The Associated Press September 20, 2018 03:42:48 IST
Texas Republicans say sorry for likening Hindu deity Ganesha to party's elephant symbol amid Congressional race featuring Indian-American Sri Preston Kulkarni

Austin, Texas: Republican leaders in suburban Houston have apologized for an advertisement likening the Hindu deity Ganesha to the GOP's elephant symbol amid a congressional race featuring an Indian-American Democrat.

The ad was sponsored by the Fort Bend County Republican Party and published last week in a newspaper popular with area Indian-Americans.

It wished Hindus a happy Ganesh Chaturthi, or festival celebrating the elephant-headed Ganesha's birth, asking, "Would you worship a donkey or an elephant?"
The Hindu American Foundation calls the ad "problematic and offensive." Democrat Sri Preston Kulkarni, running to unseat Republican Rep. Pete Olson, says it "promotes inaccurate stereotypes."

Texas Republicans say sorry for likening Hindu deity Ganesha to partys elephant symbol amid Congressional race featuring IndianAmerican Sri Preston Kulkarni

Snapshot of the GOP ad depicting the Hindu deity Ganesha. Twitter screengrab.

GOP county chairman Jacey Jetton offered "sincerest apologies" in a Wednesday statement, while Olson campaign manager Craig Lewellyn says "Pete agrees" the ad "should have been more respectful."

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