Spain to discuss new state of emergency at cabinet meeting on Sunday

MADRID (Reuters) - Spain will hold a special cabinet meeting on Sunday to discuss a new state of emergency after regions urged government action to allow them to impose curfews to help tackle its escalating COVID-19 outbreak. Ten of Spain's 17 regions including Asturias, Castilla-La Mancha and the Basque Country had called on the government to decree a state of emergency, which would allow them to limit people's movements

Reuters October 25, 2020 01:10:35 IST
Spain to discuss new state of emergency at cabinet meeting on Sunday

Spain to discuss new state of emergency at cabinet meeting on Sunday

MADRID (Reuters) - Spain will hold a special cabinet meeting on Sunday to discuss a new state of emergency after regions urged government action to allow them to impose curfews to help tackle its escalating COVID-19 outbreak.

Ten of Spain's 17 regions including Asturias, Castilla-La Mancha and the Basque Country had called on the government to decree a state of emergency, which would allow them to limit people's movements.

In a statement on Saturday the government said it had on Friday offered to convene the meeting. "The proposal has been welcomed positively by the majority of regions, who have requested it", the statement said.

Meanwhile the Valencia region announced its own curfew from Saturday night until Dec. 9. Regional President Ximo Puig said the curfew, between midnight and 6am, would be covered by a law on procedural measures to deal with COVID-19 which "implicitly" states that such measures could be taken without the need for a state of emergency.

While many regions favour some form of curfew, the Madrid region opposes it, a stance which has so far prevented a nationwide decision.

Spain has recorded the highest number of COVID-19 infections in Western Europe. Total cases rose to 1,046,132 on Friday, while the death toll is nearing 35,000.

Catalonia said on Friday it would impose a curfew across the region, which includes Barcelona, as soon as the central government acted.

"We need a decentralised state of emergency in which the Catalan government maintains all management capacity," deputy Catalan leader Pere Aragones told a news conference.

Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez's government would likely have enough votes to pass the measure in parliament. It would have the votes of the Basque Nationalist Party and other regional parties who support the measure.

(Reporting by Jessica Jones; Editing by Alison Williams and David Holmes)

This story has not been edited by Firstpost staff and is generated by auto-feed.

Updated Date:

TAGS:

Find latest and upcoming tech gadgets online on Tech2 Gadgets. Get technology news, gadgets reviews & ratings. Popular gadgets including laptop, tablet and mobile specifications, features, prices, comparison.

also read

Bolivia restores ties with Iran, Venezuela after socialists return to power
World

Bolivia restores ties with Iran, Venezuela after socialists return to power

By Daniel Ramos and Aislinn Laing LA PAZ (Reuters) - Bolivia's new president, Luis Arce, has moved swiftly to restore ties with Iran and Venezuela, receiving the credentials of ambassadors from the two countries on Wednesday, just three days after his socialist party retook the reins of power.

Saudi king urges international community to take decisive stance against Iran
World

Saudi king urges international community to take decisive stance against Iran

RIYADH (Reuters) - Saudi Arabia's King Salman urged the international community on Thursday to take a decisive stance that "radically" addresses efforts by Iran to develop nuclear and ballistic missile programs. The king made his remarks virtually in an annual address to the appointed Shura Council, a top governmental advisory body

Donations under $8K to Trump ‘election defense’ instead go to president, RNC
World

Donations under $8K to Trump ‘election defense’ instead go to president, RNC

By Jarrett Renshaw and Joseph Tanfani (Reuters) - As President Donald Trump seeks to discredit last week's election with baseless claims of voter fraud, his team has bombarded his supporters with requests for money to help pay for legal challenges to the results: “The Left will try to STEAL this election!” reads one text. But any small-dollar donations from Trump's grassroots donors won't be going to legal expenses at all, according to a Reuters review of the legal language in the solicitations