Edward Snowden did 'service,' but should still be punished: Former US Attorney General

Edward Snowden performed a 'public service' in stoking a national debate about secret domestic surveillance programs, but he should still return to the US to stand trial, former US Attorney General Eric Holder said in a podcast released on Monday.

AP May 31, 2016 08:20:21 IST
Edward Snowden did 'service,' but should still be punished: Former US Attorney General

Washington: Edward Snowden performed a "public service" in stoking a national debate about secret domestic surveillance programs, but he should still return to the US to stand trial, former US Attorney General Eric Holder said in a podcast released on Monday.

As a National Security Agency contractor, Snowden leaked classified details in 2013 of the US government's warrantless surveillance of its citizens before fleeing the country. He now lives in Russia and faces US charges that could land him in prison for up to 30 years.

Edward Snowden did service but should still be punished Former US Attorney General

File photo of Edward Snowden. Reuters

In a podcast interview with CNN political commentator David Axelrod, Holder said that Snowden had grown concerned that the domestic spying programs weren't providing a "substantial" return of useful intelligence even before even before he revealed the secrets.

Axelrod is a former senior adviser to President Barack Obama, while Holder served as attorney general from 2009 to 2015.

"We can certainly argue about the way in which Snowden did what he did, but I think that he actually performed a public service by raising the debate we engaged in and by the changes that we made," Holder said. "Now, I would say doing what he did in the way he did it was inappropriate and illegal."

Holder said Snowden's leaks harmed American interests abroad and put intelligence assets at risk.

"He's got to make a decision," Holder said of Snowden. "He's broken the law. In my view, he needs to get lawyers, come on back and decide what he wants to do — go to trial, try to cut a deal."

He said Snowden should have to face consequences for his actions, including prison time.

"But in deciding what an appropriate sentence should be, a judge could take into account the usefulness of having that national debate," Holder added.

Snowden has repeatedly said he would be willing to return to the United States if the federal government would provide him a fair trial. However, Snowden says he is concerned that under federal espionage laws he would not allow him to present a whistleblower defense, arguing in court he acted in the public interest.

Updated Date:

also read

US govt reverses Donald Trump-era policy to reject certain H-1B visa applications
World

US govt reverses Donald Trump-era policy to reject certain H-1B visa applications

The earlier policy had allowed immigration officers to reject H-1B visa applications instead of first issuing a notice of intent to deny to the applicants

Beyond Hollywood's big-budget In the Heights, colourism persists, and is rarely addressed
Entertainment

Beyond Hollywood's big-budget In the Heights, colourism persists, and is rarely addressed

Colorism — or discrimination against darker-skinned people within their same ethnic group — lurks deep among pretty much all communities with varying levels of melanin. But it doesn’t get talked about, and that could be a setback for the racial justice efforts that intensified after the police killing of George Floyd last year.

President Joe Biden encourages countrywide July Fourth celebrations to mark return to normalcy following COVID-19
World

President Joe Biden encourages countrywide July Fourth celebrations to mark return to normalcy following COVID-19

The planned celebration will be the largest event of Biden’s presidency and is designed to demonstrate the nation’s victory over the virus as COVID-19 cases and deaths drop to levels not seen since the first days of the outbreak.