Romania sets date for referendum to block gay marriage

BUCHAREST (Reuters) - Romania set an Oct. 6-7 date for a referendum to change the constitutional definition of marriage to a union between a man and a woman, aimed at preventing same sex partnerships from ever being legal in one of the few EU states to still ban them. Most EU countries allow either same sex marriages or civil partnerships, but Romania does not even recognise those performed abroad.

Reuters September 19, 2018 00:08:03 IST
Romania sets date for referendum to block gay marriage

Romania sets date for referendum to block gay marriage

BUCHAREST (Reuters) - Romania set an Oct. 6-7 date for a referendum to change the constitutional definition of marriage to a union between a man and a woman, aimed at preventing same sex partnerships from ever being legal in one of the few EU states to still ban them.

Most EU countries allow either same sex marriages or civil partnerships, but Romania does not even recognise those performed abroad. Its constitution now defines a family as including spouses, without explicitly specifying their sex.

A group called Coalition for the Family has collected 3 million signatures in favour of the change. The lower house of parliament voted in favour last year and the senate voted earlier this month, making the referendum the last stage needed to enact the change.

Few politicians openly support same sex marriage or civil partnerships in the socially conservative eastern European nation of 20 million, where the Orthodox Church wields significant influence.

For any referendum to be valid, a third of more than 18 million Romanians with voting rights must turn out to the polls.

Rights groups are urging people to boycott the ballot, saying human rights should not be put up for a vote. They say restricting the definition of family to one based on a marriage between a man and a woman would also hurt single parents, non-married couples and other non-traditional parenting units, as well as same-sex couples.

Under Romanian law, the constitution can be changed after a proposal by the president, the government, a quarter of all lawmakers or at least 500,000 citizens. Parliament must approve any revision, which must then pass a nationwide referendum.

(Reporting by Luiza Ilie)

This story has not been edited by Firstpost staff and is generated by auto-feed.

Updated Date:

TAGS:

also read

Apple will enable storage of IDs like drivers licenses on iPhones
Business

Apple will enable storage of IDs like drivers licenses on iPhones

By Stephen Nellis (Reuters) -Apple Inc on Monday said it will offer the ability to store state-issued identification cards digitally on iPhones and that it is working with the U.S. Transportation Security Administration to accept the digital IDs at airports, one of several updates to the software that runs on its devices. It also showed updates to its FaceTime video chat app, adding the ability to schedule calls with multiple attendees and making the software compatible with Android and Windows devices.

Airline bosses call on UK and U.S. to lift trans-Atlantic travel restrictions
Business

Airline bosses call on UK and U.S. to lift trans-Atlantic travel restrictions

LONDON (Reuters) - The bosses of all airlines flying passenger services between Britain and the United States called on Monday for the countries' governments to relax COVID-19 restrictions to reopen travel routes between the two countries. After more than a year of restrictions, the CEOs of American Airlines, IAG unit British Airways, Delta Air Lines, United Airlines and JetBlue Airways Corp said high vaccination rates in both countries meant travel could restart safely. The push for reopening trans-Atlantic routes on Monday comes ahead of meetings between U.S.

EU patience wearing thin with UK on N.Ireland, weighing options
Business

EU patience wearing thin with UK on N.Ireland, weighing options

BRUSSELS (Reuters) - The European Union's patience towards Britain over Brexit arrangements in Northern Ireland is wearing thin and the bloc will consider its options should Britain continue its "confrontational path", an EU official said on Monday.