Rex Tillerson ousted from office: Senate Democrats want next secretary of state to be tougher on Russia

Top United States Senate Democrats on Tuesday blasted President Donald Trump’s stance on Russia as too soft

AFP March 14, 2018 09:00:01 IST
Rex Tillerson ousted from office: Senate Democrats want next secretary of state to be tougher on Russia

Washington: Top United States Senate Democrats on Tuesday blasted President Donald Trump’s stance on Russia as too soft and indicated that his approach to the country accused of meddling in US elections will come up when they consider his nominee for secretary of state next month.

Saying that outgoing Secretary of State Rex Tillerson “was not close to tough enough on Russia,” Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer said he hoped that Mike Pompeo, nominated to head the State Department, “will be a lot tougher and we hope he can persuade the president to be tougher, because the president is not serving American interests.”

Updated Date:

also read

Pentagon chief reaffirms India-US partnership, criticises China's 'unprecedented provocations in the Taiwan Strait'
World

Pentagon chief reaffirms India-US partnership, criticises China's 'unprecedented provocations in the Taiwan Strait'

During the opening remarks in Washington, US Defence Secretary Lloyd Austin recalled his recent call with Defence Minister Rajnath Singh and said that the defence partnership between India and the US is going strong and from strength to strength

Bank CEOs warn that US economy faces threat from high inflation, rising interest rates
World

Bank CEOs warn that US economy faces threat from high inflation, rising interest rates

With inflation rising as high as 9 per cent this year, the US Fed has aggressively raised rates from near zero to a range of 3 per cent to 3.25 per cent in a few months. Fed Chair Jerome Powell acknowledged that households will feel an impact

High inflation in sight, Fed to signal more rate hikes ahead
World

High inflation in sight, Fed to signal more rate hikes ahead

In a further sign of the Fed's deepening concern about inflation, it will also likely signal on Wednesday that it plans to raise rates much higher by year's end than it had forecast three months ago — and to keep them higher for longer