Planet 10 times Earth's mass may have smacked Jupiter long ago

By Will Dunham WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Jupiter, the solar system's largest planet, may have been smacked head-on by an embryonic planet 10 times Earth's mass not long after being formed, a monumental crash with apparent lasting effects on the Jovian core, scientists said on Thursday. The violent collision, hypothesised by astronomers to explain data collected by NASA's Juno spacecraft, may have occurred just several million years after the birth of the sun roughly 4.5 billion years ago following the dispersal of the primordial disk of dust and gas that gave rise to solar system. 'We believe that impacts, and in particular giant impacts, might have been rather common during the infancy of the solar system.

Reuters August 16, 2019 01:12:54 IST
Planet 10 times Earth's mass may have smacked Jupiter long ago

Planet 10 times Earths mass may have smacked Jupiter long ago

By Will Dunham

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Jupiter, the solar system's largest planet, may have been smacked head-on by an embryonic planet 10 times Earth's mass not long after being formed, a monumental crash with apparent lasting effects on the Jovian core, scientists said on Thursday.

The violent collision, hypothesised by astronomers to explain data collected by NASA's Juno spacecraft, may have occurred just several million years after the birth of the sun roughly 4.5 billion years ago following the dispersal of the primordial disk of dust and gas that gave rise to solar system.

"We believe that impacts, and in particular giant impacts, might have been rather common during the infancy of the solar system. For example, we believe that our moon formed after such an event. However, the impact that we postulate for Jupiter is a real monster," astronomer Andrea Isella of Rice University in Houston said.

Under this scenario, the still-forming planet plunged into and was consumed by Jupiter.

Jupiter, a gas giant planet covered in thick red, brown, yellow and white clouds, boasts a diameter of about 89,000 miles (143,000 km). Interior models based on Juno data indicated Jupiter has a large "diluted" core representing about 5 to 15 percent of the planet's mass comprised of rocky and icy material unexpectedly mixed with light elements like hydrogen and helium.

"Juno measures Jupiter's gravity field to an extraordinary precision. Scientists use that information to infer Jupiter's composition and interior structures," said Shang-Fei Liu, associate professor of astronomy at Sun Yat-sen University in Zhuhai, China, and lead author of the research published in the journal Nature.

Computer models indicated that a head-on collision with a protoplanet - a planet in its formative stages - of roughly 10 Earth masses would have broken apart Jupiter's dense core and mixed light and heavy elements, explaining Juno's findings, the researchers said.

This protoplanet, with a composition similar to Jupiter's primordial core, may have been slightly less massive than the solar system's most distant ice giant planets Uranus and Neptune and would have become a full-fledged gas giant if it had not been swallowed by Jupiter, Liu said.

Jupiter already would have been fully formed at the time, with its strong gravitational pull perhaps precipitating the collision. Jupiter's mass is about 320 times that of Earth.

Liu said tens of thousands of computer simulations indicated at least a 40% chance that Jupiter was hit by a protoplanet early in its history, with this impact scenario offering "by far the best explanation" for the nature of Jupiter's core.

(Reporting by Will Dunham; Editing by Sandra Maler)

This story has not been edited by Firstpost staff and is generated by auto-feed.

Updated Date:

TAGS:

Find latest and upcoming tech gadgets online on Tech2 Gadgets. Get technology news, gadgets reviews & ratings. Popular gadgets including laptop, tablet and mobile specifications, features, prices, comparison.

also read

Gilead nears deal to buy Immunomedics for more than $20 billion, WSJ reports
Business

Gilead nears deal to buy Immunomedics for more than $20 billion, WSJ reports

(Reuters) - Gilead Sciences Inc is nearing a deal to buy biopharmaceutical company Immunomedics Inc for more than $20 billion, the Wall Street Journal reported on Saturday, citing people familiar with the matter. A deal for Immunomedics, which last month reported positive data from a late-stage study for its breast-cancer drug, could be announced Monday if not sooner, the Journal said https://www.wsj.com/articles/gilead-nears-deal-to-buy-immunomedics-for-more-than-20-billion-11599936777?mod=hp_lead_pos2. Gilead and Immunomedics did not respond immediately to emailed requests from Reuters for comment

China bans German pork imports after African swine fever case
Business

China bans German pork imports after African swine fever case

SHANGHAI (Reuters) - China banned pork imports from Germany on Saturday after it confirmed its first case of African swine fever last week, in a move set to hit German producers and push up global prices as China's meat supplies tighten. China's ban on imports from its third largest supplier comes as the world's top meat buyer deals with an unprecedented pork shortage after its own epidemic of the deadly hog disease. The ban on Germany, which has supplied about 14% of China's pork imports so far this year, will push up demand for meat from other major suppliers like the United States and Spain, boosting global prices.

Libya's Haftar committed to ending oil blockade, U.S. says
Business

Libya's Haftar committed to ending oil blockade, U.S. says

CAIRO (Reuters) - Libyan commander Khalifa Haftar has committed to ending a months-long blockade of oil facilities, the U.S.