Photos: Surviving staff of Charlie Hebdo release new issue amidst tears and a few laughs

 Photos: Surviving staff of Charlie Hebdo release new issue amidst tears and a few laughs

Satirical French magazine Charlie Hebdo columnist Patrick Pelloux (R) and cartoonist Luz (L) show a copy of their next issue titled "Tout est pardonne" ("All is forgiven") showing a caricature of Prophet Mohammad during a news conference at the French newspaper Liberation offices in Paris. , January 13, 2015. Charlie Hebdo will publish the front page showing a caricature of the Prophet Mohammad in its first edition since Islamist gunmen attacked the satirical newspaper. Reuters

Renald Luzier, known as Luz, left, and columnist Patrick Pelloux, look at the Charlie Hebdo paper during a press conference in Paris, France, Tuesday, Jan. 13, 2015. The surviving staff of Charlie Hebdo is putting out an unprecedented 3 million copies of its upcoming issue. AP

Renald Luzier, known as Luz, left, and columnist Patrick Pelloux, look at the Charlie Hebdo paper during a press conference. The surviving staff of Charlie Hebdo is putting out an unprecedented 3 million copies of its upcoming issue. AP

The new chief editor of French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, Gerard Biard, left, and columnist Patrick Pelloux, right, comfort cartoonist Luz during a press conference in Paris, France, Tuesday, Jan. 13, 2015. Twelve people died when two masked gunmen assaulted the newspaper’s offices on Jan. 7, including much of the editorial staff and two police. It was the beginning of three days of terror around Paris that saw 17 people killed before the three Islamic extremist attackers were gunned down by security forces. Charlie Hebdo had faced repeated threats for depictions of the prophet, and its editor and his police bodyguard were the first to die. AP

The new chief editor of French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, Gerard Biard, left, and columnist Patrick Pelloux, right, comfort cartoonist Luz during a press conference. Twelve people died when two masked gunmen assaulted the newspaper’s offices, including much of the editorial staff and two police. Charlie Hebdo had faced repeated threats for depictions of the prophet, and its editor and his police bodyguard were the first to die. AP

Cartoonist Renald Luzier, known as Luz attends a press conference in Paris, France, Tuesday, Jan. 13, 2015. The surviving staff of Charlie Hebdo is putting out an unprecedented 3 million copies of its upcoming issue. AP

Cartoonist Renald Luzier, known as Luz attends a press conference. With demand surging for the edition due on Wednesday, the weekly planned to print up to 3 million copies and in sixteen languages, dwarfing its usual run of 60,000, after newsagents reported that large numbers of customers around the country were placing orders. AP

The new chief editor of French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, Gerard Biard, left, and Cartoonist Renald Luzier, known as Luz leave after a press conference in Paris, France, Tuesday, Jan. 13, 2015. Twelve people died when two masked gunmen assaulted the newspaper’s offices on Jan. 7, including much of the editorial staff and two police. It was the beginning of three days of terror around Paris that saw 17 people killed before the three Islamic extremist attackers were gunned down by security forces. Charlie Hebdo had faced repeated threats for depictions of the prophet, and its editor and his police bodyguard were the first to die. AP

The new chief editor of French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, Gerard Biard, left, and Cartoonist Luz leave after a press conference in Paris, France. AP

Satirical French magazine Charlie Hebdo columnist Patrick Pelloux (R) and cartoonist Luz (L) attend a news conference at the French newspaper Liberation offices in Paris, January 13, 2015. Charlie Hebdo will publish the front page showing a caricature of the Prophet Mohammad holding a sign saying "Je suis Charlie" in its first edition since Islamist gunmen attacked the satirical newspaper. With demand surging for the edition due on Wednesday, the weekly planned to print up to 3 million copies and in sixteen languages, dwarfing its usual run of 60,000, after newsagents reported that large numbers of customers around the country were placing orders. REUTERS

Satirical French magazine Charlie Hebdo columnist Patrick Pelloux (R) and cartoonist Luz (L) share a lighter moment. Reuters

Updated Date: Jan 14, 2015 15:48:05 IST