Photos: India's Kailash Satyarthi and Pakistan's Malala Yousafzai share 2014 Nobel Peace Prize

Photos: Indias Kailash Satyarthi and Pakistans Malala Yousafzai share 2014 Nobel Peace Prize

Pakistani child education activist Malala Yousafzai and child rights activist Kailash Satyarthi of India have won the Nobel Peace Prize 2014. Satyarthi's Bachpan Bachao Andolan has saved 80,000 children so far. The two were named winner of the £690,000 (8m kronor or $1.11m) prize by the chairman of the Nobel committee - Norway’s former Prime Minister Thorbjoern Jagland said. Reuters/Kailash Satyarthi's website

Reuters

Nobel Prize winners of 2014 so far are: (clockwise from top) William E. Moerner, Shuji Nakamura, Patrick Modiano, Isamu Akasaki, Stefan W Hell and Hiroshi Amano. Reuters

A screen presents the winners of the Nobel Prize in Medicine, U.S.-British scientist John O'Keefe and Norwegian husband and wife Edvard Moser and May-Britt Moser for their discoveries of cells that constitute a positioning system in the brain, at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm October 6, 2014. O'Keefe and May-Britt and Edvard Moser won the 2014 Nobel prize for medicine or physiology for discoveries of cells that constitute a positioning system in the brain, the award-giving body said on Monday. REUTERS

US-British scientist John O'Keefe and Norwegian couple and scientists Edvard Moser and May-Britt Moser won the Nobel in Medicine for their discoveries of cells that constitute a positioning system in the brain. REUTERS

Physicists Per Delsing, Staffan Nordmark, Anne L'Huillier and Olle Inganas (seated L-R) announce Japanese scientists Isamu Akasaki and Hiroshi Amano, and U.S. scientist Shuji Nakamura (L-R) as the 2014 Nobel Physics Laureates at the Royal Swedish Academy of Science in Stockholm, October 7, 2014. Japan's Akasaki and Amano, and Nakamura of the U.S. won the 2014 Nobel Prize for Physics for inventing a new energy efficient and environmentally friendly light source, the LED, the award-giving body said on Tuesday.   REUTERS

(From left to right on screen) American scientist Eric Betzig, Germany's Stefan Hell and US scientist William Moerner won the 2014 Nobel prize for chemistry for the development of super-resolved fluorescence microscopy. REUTERS

Books by French writer Patrick Modiano are displayed at the bookstore of French publishing house Gallimard in Paris October 9, 2014. French writer Patrick Modiano has won the Nobel Prize for Literature as "a Marcel Proust of our time," The Swedish Academy said on Thursday. The academy said the award of 8 million Swedish crowns ($1.1 million) was "for the art of memory with which he has evoked the most ungraspable human destinies and uncovered the life-world of the occupation".     REUTERS

Books by French author Patrick Modiano on display at a bookstore in Paris. The author has won the Nobel Literature. Reuters

Japanese scientists Isamu Akasaki and Hiroshi Amano, and U.S. scientist Shuji Nakamura (L-R) are seen on a screen after being announced as the 2014 Nobel Physics Laureates at the Royal Swedish Academy of Science in Stockholm, October 7, 2014. Japan's Akasaki and Amano, and Nakamura of the U.S. won the 2014 Nobel Prize for Physics for inventing a new energy efficient and environmentally friendly light source, the LED, the award-giving body said on Tuesday.   REUTERS

(Left to right) Japanese scientists Isamu Akasaki and Hiroshi Amano, and US scientist Shuji Nakamura won the 2014 Nobel Prize for Physics for inventing a new energy efficient and environmentally friendly light source, the LED, the award-giving body said on Tuesday. REUTERS

Professor John O'Keefe walks back to his office at University College London (UCL), in London October 6, 2014. Anglo-American John O'Keefe and Norwegian couple May-Britt and Edvard Moser won the 2014 Nobel Prize for medicine on Monday for discovering the brain's internal positioning system, helping humans find their way and giving clues to how strokes and Alzheimer's affect the brain. REUTERS

Professor John O'Keefe near his office at the University College London. Anglo-American O'Keefe's discovery could be a breakthrough in treating dementia. REUTERS

Norwegian scientists May-Britt and Edvard Moser smile when they receive the Fernstrom award in Lund in this September 22, 2008 file photo. American-British scientist John O'Keefe and Norwegians May-Britt Moser and Edvard Moser won the 2014 Nobel Prize for medicine for discovering the brain's "inner GPS" that makes it possible to orient ourselves in space and help understand diseases like Alzheimer's, the award-giving body said on October 6, 2014. REUTERS

Norwegian scientists May-Britt and Edvard Moser who are married to each other in a file photo. REUTERS

French writer Patrick Modiano reacts as he attends a news conference at the French publishing house Gallimard in Paris October 9, 2014 after he was declared the winner of the 2014 Nobel Prize for Literature in Stockholm. French writer Patrick Modiano has won the Nobel Prize for Literature as "a Marcel Proust of our time," The Swedish Academy said on Thursday. The academy said the award of 8 million Swedish crowns ($1.1 million) was "for the art of memory with which he has evoked the most ungraspable human destinies and uncovered the life-world of the occupation".     REUTERS

French author Patrick Modiano at a news conference in Paris after he was declared the winner of the 2014 Nobel Prize for Literature in Stockholm. REUTERS

Japanese-born U.S. citizen Shuji Nakamura (L) holds a blue LED light at a news conference after winning the 2014 Nobel Prize for Physics, at the University of California Santa Barbara in Isla Vista, California October 7, 2014. An American and two Japanese scientists won the 2014 Nobel Prize for Physics on Tuesday for inventing a new energy-efficient and environment-friendly light source, leading to the creation of modern LED light bulbs. Isamu Akasaki and Hiroshi Amano of Japan and Nakamura won the prize for developing the blue light-emitting diode (LED) -- the missing piece that now allows manufacturers to produce white-light lamps.  REUTERS

Japanese-born US scientist Shuji Nakamura show the blue LED light which won him and two other scientists - Isamu Akasaki and Hiroshi Amano - the Nobel prize for Physics for inventing a new energy-efficient and environment-friendly light source, leading to the creation of modern LED light bulbs. REUTERS

Japanese scientist Hiroshi Amano, a professor at Nagoya University, smile as he answers a question in Grenoble, in this photo taken by Kyodo October 7, 2014. Amano, together with Isamu Akasaki of Japan and Japanese-born U.S. citizen Shuji Nakamura, won the 2014 Nobel Prize for Physics on Tuesday for inventing a new energy-efficient and environment-friendly light source, leading to the creation of modern LED light bulbs. Mandatory credit.   REUTERS

Japanese scientist Hiroshi Amano, a professor at Nagoya University, smiles for the camera at a press conference after he was declared one of the winners of the 2014 Nobel. REUTERS

American scientist and Nobel prize winner Eric Betzig talks to journalist prior to a lecture at the Helmholz center in Munich October 8, 2014. U.S. citizens Eric Betzig and William Moerner and Germany's Stefan Hell won the 2014 Nobel Prize for Chemistry on Wednesday for smashing the size barrier in optical microscopes, allowing researchers to see individual molecules inside living cells. REUTERS

American scientist and Nobel prize winner Eric Betzig speaks to journalists prior to a lecture at the Helmholz center in Munich. US. citizens Eric Betzig and William Moerner and Germany's Stefan Hell won the 2014 Nobel Prize for Chemistry. REUTERS

German scientist and Nobel prize winner Stefan Hell poses with a nanoscale microscope at the Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry in Goettingen October 8, 2014. U.S. citizens Eric Betzig and William Moerner and Germany's Stefan Hell won the 2014 Nobel Prize for Chemistry on Wednesday for smashing the size barrier in optical microscopes, allowing researchers to see individual molecules inside living cells.   REUTERS

German scientist and Nobel prize winner Stefan Hell poses with a nanoscale microscope at the Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry in Goettingen. REUTERS

U.S. scientist William Moerner, laureate of the 2014 Nobel Prize for Chemistry, gestures in Recife October 8, 2014. Germany's Stefan Hell and two American scientists, Eric Betzig and Moerner, won the 2014 Nobel Prize for Chemistry on Wednesday for smashing the size barrier in optical microscopes, allowing researchers to see individual molecules inside living cells. REUTERS

US scientist William Moerner before a press conference. Moerner with two other scientists won the Nobel in Chemistry for smashing the size barrier in optical microscopes, allowing researchers to see individual molecules inside living cells. REUTERS

Japanese-born U.S. citizen Shuji Nakamura laughs as he listens to speakers at a news conference at SORAA, the company he co-founded, a day after winning the 2014 Nobel Prize for Physics, in Fremont, California October 8, 2014. Nakamura, Isamu Akasaki and Hiroshi Amano of Japan won the prize for developing the blue light-emitting diode (LED) -- the missing piece that now allows manufacturers to produce white-light lamps. REUTERS

Japanese-born scientist Shuji Nakamura during a press conference in Fremont, California. REUTERS

Meijo University professor Isamu Akasaki (C) is presented with a bouquet of flowers from his laboratory staff members during a news conference at Meijo University in Nagoya, central Japan, in this photo taken by Kyodo October 7, 2014. Japanese scientists Akasaki and Hiroshi Amano and American Shuji Nakamura won the 2014 Nobel prize for Physics for inventing a new energy efficient and environmentally friendly light source, the LED, the award-giving body said on Tuesday. Mandatory credit   REUTERS

Meijo University professor Isamu Akasaki (centre) is presented with a bouquet of flowers after the Nobel awards were announced. REUTERS

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Updated Date: Oct 10, 2014 15:24:35 IST

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