Photos: How ESA's Philae lander reached comet 67P

 Photos: How ESAs Philae lander reached comet 67P

The image shows comet 67P/CG acquired by the ROLIS instrument on the Philae lander during descent on Nov 12 from a distance of approximately 3 km from the surface. The landing site is imaged with a resolution of about 3m per pixel. Associated Press

Artist impression showing Philae separating from Rosetta and descending to the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Source: esa website

Artist's impression showing Philae separating from Rosetta and descending to the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The 100-kg (220-pound) lander - virtually weightless on the comet's surface - touched down on schedule at about 1600 GMT after a seven-hour descent from its orbiting mothership Rosetta, now located a half-billion kilometres (300 million miles) from Earth. Source: ESA website

Receipt of signal from comet surface just after Philae landed on 12 November 2014. Source: esa website

Scientists at the European Space Agency getting the receipt of signal from comet surface just after Philae landed. Philae has ten instruments on board — including devices to measure light, electrical magnetism and heat — and flying up above the comet the Rosetta spacecraft has another 11 instruments. ESA Website

Rosetta’s OSIRIS narrow-angle camera captured this parting shot of the Philae lander after separation. The Philae lander will provide plenty of images of a world no human has ever seen close up and will drill below the surface to extract a sample of the comet that will be analyzed onboard. ESA Website

Smiles in the Main Control Room at ESA's Operations Centre, ESOC, as separation of the Philae lander from ESA Rosetta orbiter is confirmed. The Philae lander has separated from ESA's Rosetta orbiter, and is now on its way to becoming the first spacecraft to touch down on a comet. Separation was confirmed at ESA’s Space Operation Centre, ESOC, in Darmstadt, Germany at 09:03 GMT / 10:03 CET. It takes the radio signals from the transmitter on Rosetta 28 minutes and 20 seconds to reach Earth, so separation actually occurred in space at 08:35 GMT / 09:35 CET. Source: esa website

Smiles in the Main Control Room at ESA's Operations Centre, ESOC, as separation of the Philae lander from ESA Rosetta orbiter is confirmed. ESA Website

Rosetta’s lander Philae took this parting shot of its mothership shortly after separation. The image was taken with the lander’s CIVA-P imaging system and captures one of Rosetta's 14 metre-long solar arrays. It was stored onboard the lander until the radio link was established with Rosetta around two hours after separation, and then relayed to Earth. The comet is on a 6 ½-year elliptical orbit around the sun. At the moment it is getting closer to our star. This makes for great science, since Philae and Rosetta will be able to observe the comet becoming more active. ESA Website

Smiles in the Main Control Room at ESA's Operations Centre, ESOC, as separation of the Philae lander from ESA Rosetta orbiter is confirmed. The Philae lander has separated from ESA's Rosetta orbiter, and is now on its way to becoming the first spacecraft to touch down on a comet. Separation was confirmed at ESA’s Space Operation Centre, ESOC, in Darmstadt, Germany at 09:03 GMT / 10:03 CET. It takes the radio signals from the transmitter on Rosetta 28 minutes and 20 seconds to reach Earth, so separation actually occurred in space at 08:35 GMT / 09:35 CET. Source: esa website

Smiles in the Main Control Room at ESA's Operations Centre, ESOC, as separation of the Philae lander from ESA Rosetta orbiter is confirmed. ESA Website

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Updated Date: Nov 13, 2014 10:03:47 IST