"Overjoyed" Harry and Meghan expecting second child

LONDON (Reuters) - Britain's Prince Harry and his wife Meghan, the Duke and Duchess of Sussex, are expecting their second child, a spokesperson for the couple said on Sunday. Harry, 36, and Meghan, 39, stepped back from royal duties in January 2020 and moved with their first son Archie to Southern California to live a more independent life and escape the British media. 'We can confirm that Archie is going to be a big brother.

Reuters February 15, 2021 04:10:13 IST
"Overjoyed" Harry and Meghan expecting second child

quotOverjoyedquot Harry and Meghan expecting second child

LONDON (Reuters) - Britain's Prince Harry and his wife Meghan, the Duke and Duchess of Sussex, are expecting their second child, a spokesperson for the couple said on Sunday.

Harry, 36, and Meghan, 39, stepped back from royal duties in January 2020 and moved with their first son Archie to Southern California to live a more independent life and escape the British media.

"We can confirm that Archie is going to be a big brother. The Duke and Duchess of Sussex are overjoyed to be expecting their second child," the spokesperson said.

Archie was born in May 2019.

The Valentine's Day announcement was accompanied by a black and white photograph of a visibly pregnant Meghan lying on grass with one hand on her stomach and her head resting on the smiling prince's leg. The photo was taken by longtime friend and photographer Misan Harriman.

Queen Elizabeth and her husband Prince Philip, Harry's father Prince Charles and the whole family were "delighted" and wished the couple well, a Buckingham Palace spokesman said.

Since ending their royal duties, Harry and Meghan have continued charity work and signed TV and other media deals, launching their debut podcast in December.

Last year, Meghan revealed that she had a miscarriage in July, in an extraordinarily personal disclosure coming from a high-profile British royal.

The couple married in a glittering ceremony in 2018 that captured the world's attention but later gave up their official royal roles following disagreements with other family members and in the face of huge media attention.

Their relationship with the British press swiftly soured and the couple have launched legal cases against several newspapers.

Last week Meghan won a privacy claim against Associated Newspapers after its Mail on Sunday paper had printed extracts of a letter she wrote to her father in August 2018.

(Reporting by Kanishka Singh in Bengaluru, Michael Holden and William James in London; Editing by Alexander Smith, Emelia Sithole-Matarise and Diane Craft)

This story has not been edited by Firstpost staff and is generated by auto-feed.

Updated Date:

TAGS:

Subscribe to Moneycontrol Pro at ₹499 for the first year. Use code PRO499. Limited period offer. *T&C apply

also read

Robinhood now a go-to for young investors and short sellers
Business

Robinhood now a go-to for young investors and short sellers

By John McCrank NEW YORK (Reuters) - Robinhood, the online brokerage used by many retail traders to pile in to heavily shorted stocks like GameStop Corp, has made an ambitious push into loaning out its clients' shares to short sellers as it expands its business. The broker had $1.9 billion in shares loaned out as of Dec. 31, nearly three times the $674 million a year earlier, and it was permitted to lend out $4.6 billion worth of securities under margin agreements, around five times bigger than the prior year, according to an annual regulatory filing late on Monday

Wall Street mixed as Apple and Tesla retreat
Business

Wall Street mixed as Apple and Tesla retreat

By Noel Randewich (Reuters) - Wall Street was mixed on Tuesday, with Apple and Tesla losing ground, while materials and energy companies climbed as investors looked toward the U.S. Congress approving another stimulus package.

Biden's SEC nominee vows review of GameStop trading issues, climate disclosures
Business

Biden's SEC nominee vows review of GameStop trading issues, climate disclosures

By Pete Schroeder and Chris Prentice WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. President Joe Biden's pick to head a key market regulator promised on Tuesday a thorough review of issues raised by the GameStop Corp stock frenzy and suggested companies may have to disclose their potential risks from climate change