New York Times to move part of Hong Kong office to Seoul in wake of security law

By Anne Marie Roantree and Marius Zaharia HONG KONG (Reuters) - The New York Times will shift part of its Hong Kong office to Seoul, the latest sign of the chill spreading in the global financial centre just two weeks after Beijing imposed a new national security law.

Reuters July 16, 2020 00:18:34 IST
New York Times to move part of Hong Kong office to Seoul in wake of security law

New York Times to move part of Hong Kong office to Seoul in wake of security law

By Anne Marie Roantree and Marius Zaharia

HONG KONG (Reuters) - The New York Times will shift part of its Hong Kong office to Seoul, the latest sign of the chill spreading in the global financial centre just two weeks after Beijing imposed a new national security law.

The Times said its employees have faced challenges securing work permits and it would move its digital team of journalists, roughly a third of its Hong Kong staff, to the South Korean capital over the next year.

The move delivers a blow to the city's status as a hub for journalism in Asia, and comes as China and the United States have clashed over journalists of each nation working in the other.

This year, Beijing said journalists no longer allowed to work in mainland China could not work in Hong Kong either.

"Given the uncertainty of the moment, we are making plans to geographically diversify our editing staff," a spokeswoman for the Times told Reuters.

"We will maintain a large presence in Hong Kong and have every intention of maintaining our coverage of Hong Kong and China."

In a statement, the Hong Kong government said the city remained a regional media hub.

Other international media, such as the Wall Street Journal, the Financial Times and Agence France-Presse, also have their Asia headquarters in Hong Kong.

Reuters moved its Asia headquarters to Singapore in 1997, the year Britain handed Hong Kong back to China.

In another sign of the law's impact, former pro-democracy lawmaker Au Nok-sin said on Wednesday he was stepping down over Beijing's accusation that a primary election he helped organise for Hong Kong's democracy camp was illegal and could amount to subversion.

Hong Kong, at the time of its handover, was promised a high degree of autonomy that has preserved the city's tradition of a freewheeling press and allowed international media to use it for headquarters in Asia.

The new law, which prescribes terms of up to life in prison to punish what China broadly defines as secession, subversion, terrorism and collusion with foreign forces, has stoked worries about freedom of speech and media.

Authorities insist those freedoms remain intact but say national security is a red line. Leader Carrie Lam has said reporters can report freely if they do not violate the security law.

This year, Washington began treating five major Chinese state-run media entities the same as foreign embassies, before slashing to 100 the number of journalists allowed to work for Chinese state media, from 160 before.

In retaliation, China said it was revoking the accreditation of American correspondents with the New York Times, News Corp's Wall Street Journal and the Washington Post, whose credentials expire by the end of 2020.

Beijing has also expelled three Wall Street Journal correspondents, two Americans and an Australian, following an opinion column in the paper that called China the "real sick man of Asia".

(Reporting by Anne Marie Roantree and Marius Zaharia; Editing by Michael Perry and Clarence Fernandez)

This story has not been edited by Firstpost staff and is generated by auto-feed.

Updated Date:

TAGS:

also read

Rockets hit near U.S. forces and contractors in Iraq in separate attacks -officials
World

Rockets hit near U.S. forces and contractors in Iraq in separate attacks -officials

BAGHDAD (Reuters) - Rockets hit near U.S. forces and contractors in Iraq on Wednesday, including an air base north of Baghdad and a military base at Baghdad International Airport, the Iraqi army and security officials said. The army reported at least three rockets hit Balad air base, where U.S

Italian police probe subcontractor to Burberry over labour exploitation -warrant
World

Italian police probe subcontractor to Burberry over labour exploitation -warrant

By Silvia Ognibene and Silvia Aloisi FLORENCE, Italy (Reuters) -Italian police have arrested a Chinese couple accused of running a leather goods business which exploited immigrant workers it employed to make handbags for a Burberry supplier, according to an arrest warrant seen by Reuters. Tax police in Florence said in a statement that the two Chinese nationals were arrested on Wednesday as part of an investigation into alleged labour exploitation and tax fraud and that restrictive measures had been imposed on two other family members, including a ban on them leaving Italy

U.S. blacklists four Nicaraguans, including Ortega's daughter
World

U.S. blacklists four Nicaraguans, including Ortega's daughter

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The United States on Wednesday blacklisted four Nicaraguans, including a daughter of President Daniel Ortega, as Washington warned it would continue to use diplomatic and economic tools against members of the leftist government engaged in repression. The U.S. State Department called on Ortega to release detained presidential candidates as well as other civil society and opposition leaders arrested over the past week in what Washington called "an increasing wave of repression." "There are costs for those who are complicit in the regime's repression.