My absolute powers don't change anything in Egypt: Mursi

Cairo: Egypt's President Mohammed Mursi told the country's top judges today that he did not infringe on their authority when he seized near absolute powers, setting the stage for a prolonged showdown on the eve of mass protests planned by both supporters and opponents of the Islamist leader.

The uncompromising stance came during a meeting between Mursi and members of the Supreme Judiciary Council in a bid to resolve a four-day crisis that has plunged the country into a new round of turmoil with clashes between the two sides that have left one protester dead and hundreds wounded.

Mohammed Mursi. Agencies.

The judiciary, the main target of Mursi's edicts, also has pushed back, calling the decrees a power grab and an "assault" on the branch's independence. Judges and prosecutors stayed away from many courts in Cairo and other cities yesterday and today.

A spokesman said Mursi told the judges that he acted within his right as the nation's sole source of legislation when he issued decrees putting himself above judicial oversight. The president also extended the same immunity to two bodies dominated by his Islamist allies — a panel drafting a new constitution and parliament's mostly toothless upper chamber.

The spokesman, Yasser Ali, also told reporters that Mursi assured the judges that the decrees did not in any way "infringe" on the judiciary.

Ali's comments signaled Mursi's resolve not to back down or compromise on the constitutional amendments he announced last week, raising the likelihood of more violence as both sides planned competing rallies in Cairo tomorrow.

Opposition activists have denounced Mursi's decrees as a blatant power grab, and refused to enter a dialogue with the presidency before the edicts are rescinded. The president has vigorously defended the new powers, saying they are a necessary temporary measure to implement badly needed reforms and protect Egypt's transition to democracy after last year's ouster of his predecessor Hosni Mubarak.

Mursi says her wants to retain the new powers until the new constitution is adopted in a nationwide referendum and parliamentary elections are held, a time line that stretches to the middle of next year.

Many members of the judiciary were appointed under Mubarak, drawing allegations, even by some of Mursi's critics, that they are trying to perpetuate the regime's corrupt practices. But opponents are angry that the decrees leave Mursi without any check on his power.

Mursi, a member of the Muslim Brotherhood who became Egypt's first freely elected president in June, was quoted by Ali as telling his prime minister and security chiefs earlier today that his decrees were designed to "end the transitional period as soon as possible."

AP


Updated Date: Nov 27, 2012 08:29 AM

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