How Mumbai's retired sniffer dogs stack up with the rest of the World

Dog lovers can now rejoice, sniffer dogs working alongside the Mumbai police may soon get a much better life after retirement.

 How Mumbais retired sniffer dogs stack up with the rest of the World

Railway Protection Force (RPF) officer uses a sniffer dog to check bags of passengers. Reuters

According to a statement by Mumbai police commissioner Rakesh Maria, a new proposal has been sent to the state that suggests a ‘comprehensive arrangement’ to take care of the dogs’ needs once they retire.

Last year, the Hindustan Times had reported the fate of the two sniffer dogs — Max and Caesar — who were instrumental during the 26/11 terrorist attack were living on leftovers at the BDDS kennel after their retirement as there was no grant in place to pay for their food and medicines.

Here's how some of the other countries treat their prized sniffer dogs:

Australia

Australian Quarantine Inspection Service (AQIS) officers pose with trainee beagle sniffer dogs at Sydney's international airport. Reuters

Australian Quarantine Inspection Service (AQIS) officers pose with trainee beagle sniffer dogs at Sydney's international airport. Reuters

At the end of their service, detector dogs with the Australian Customs and Border Protection Service are all re-homed, and usually stay with their handler or a foster carer.

United Kingdom

European Ryder Cup player Sergio Garcia holds police sniffer dog Jura. Reuters

European Ryder Cup player Sergio Garcia holds police sniffer dog Jura. Reuters

The Ministry of Defense says military dogs are re-homed when they come to the end of their lives and that putting them down was a last resort. On the other hand, Police dog handlers can keep their dogs, otherwise a suitable family will be sought by the force. There is usually a long waiting list for them, according to the BBC. Police dogs in Nottinghamshire and England will now receive up to £1,500 ($2,394) — £500 a year for three years — for medical bills after retirement, The Telegraph reported.

United States of America

A dog from the American Police Canine Association. Reuters

A dog from the American Police Canine Association. Reuters

In the US most police dogs come under the K-9 units. The most common police dogs used for everyday duties are German Shepherds, though other breeds may be used to perform specific tasks. It's not clear what happens to the dogs after retirement. Some of them are re-homed but those with behavioural issues are put down, sparking wide protests from animal activist groups.

Netherlands

Members of independent Dutch rescue group Reddingshonden. Reuters

Members of independent Dutch rescue group Reddingshonden. Reuters

The Dutch Mounted Police and Police Dog Service (DLHP) is part of the Korps landelijke politiediensten (KLPD; National Police Services Agency) and supports other units with horse patrols and specially trained dogs. These dogs generally go on to live with their handlers after they retire.

Updated Date: Mar 25, 2015 17:48:48 IST