Islamic State suicide bomber was a former Guantanamo Bay detainee

London: An Islamic State suicide bomber who attacked Iraqi forces in Mosul was a former Guantanamo Bay detainee and was originally from Britain, the BBC reported.

IANS February 22, 2017 15:40:58 IST
Islamic State suicide bomber was a former Guantanamo Bay detainee

London: An Islamic State suicide bomber who attacked Iraqi forces in Mosul was a former Guantanamo Bay detainee and was originally from Britain, the BBC reported.

Abu-Zakariya al-Britani, originally named Ronald Fiddler, detonated a car bomb at an Iraqi army base in Tal Gaysum south-west of Mosul on Sunday. He was sent to Guantanamo Bay in 2002, the BBC said.

The Islamic State published a photograph of Fiddler, who was also known as Jamul-Uddin al-Harith before taking the nom de guerre Abu-Zakariya al-Britani.

Fiddler was seized by US forces in Pakistan in 2001. He had revealed information about the Taliban's methods and he was released after two years.

He had signed the Islamic State registration papers in April 2014 when he crossed into Syria from Turkey, the BBC said. He volunteered to be a fighter, saying his knowledge of Islam was basic.

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