Islamic State says attacked Nigerian governor's convoy

MAIDUGURI, Nigeria (Reuters) - Islamic State claimed responsibility on Wednesday for an attack on the convoy of a state governor who was headed to a rally in northeastern Nigeria ahead of Saturday's presidential election. The group said in a statement on its Amaq news agency that 42 people were killed in Tuesday's attack on Borno state's governor. Official sources told Reuters earlier on Wednesday between three and 10 people were killed, and that some of them may have been beheaded.

Reuters February 14, 2019 04:07:18 IST
Islamic State says attacked Nigerian governor's convoy

Islamic State says attacked Nigerian governors convoy

MAIDUGURI, Nigeria (Reuters) - Islamic State claimed responsibility on Wednesday for an attack on the convoy of a state governor who was headed to a rally in northeastern Nigeria ahead of Saturday's presidential election.

The group said in a statement on its Amaq news agency that 42 people were killed in Tuesday's attack on Borno state's governor. Official sources told Reuters earlier on Wednesday between three and 10 people were killed, and that some of them may have been beheaded.

Boko Haram has waged a decade-long insurgency in Nigeria's northeast which has killed around 30,000 people and forced about 2 million to leave their homes. Islamic State West Africa Province, which split from Boko Haram in 2016, has carried out a series of attack on military targets in the last few months.

Security sources said earlier on Wednesday the gunmen opened fire at the motorcade transporting Borno's state governor Kashim Shettima on his way from state capital Maiduguri to the market town of Gamboru for a rally.

Two security sources said three people died. A government and a separate security source said as many as 10 people were killed. Some of those killed may have been beheaded, they said.

There was no indication of how Shettima, a government politician, was affected by the attack. His spokesman could not be reached for comment. A security source said the convoy had returned to Maiduguri.

Borno, the birthplace of Boko Haram, has been the state worst hit by Islamist insurgents.

Incumbent Muhammadu Buhari is seeking a second term in office in Saturday's elections in Nigeria, Africa's biggest democracy. He faces a tight contest against his main challenger, Atiku Abubakar, a businessman and former vice president.

(Reporting by Ola Lanre and Ahmed Kingimi in Maiduguri and Nayera Abdallah in Cairo; Additional reporting by Paul Carsten in Abuja; Writing by Chijioke Ohuocha; Editing by Andrew Cawthorne and Sonya Hepinstall)

This story has not been edited by Firstpost staff and is generated by auto-feed.

Updated Date:

TAGS:

also read

Greek police clash with protesters in rally against mandatory vaccinations
World

Greek police clash with protesters in rally against mandatory vaccinations

ATHENS (Reuters) - Greek police used teargas and water cannon to disperse people who had gathered in central Athens on Saturday to protest against mandatory COVID-19 vaccinations. More than 4,000 people rallied outside the Greek parliament for a third time this month to oppose mandatory inoculations for some workers, such as healthcare and nursing staff.

Two Turkish soldiers killed in attack in northern Syria
World

Two Turkish soldiers killed in attack in northern Syria

ISTANBUL (Reuters) - Two Turkish soldiers were killed and two were wounded in an attack on their armoured vehicle in northern Syria, and Turkish forces immediately launched retaliatory fire, Turkey's defence ministry said on Saturday. "Our punitive fire against terrorist positions is continuing," the statement on Twitter on said. It did not specify where the attack occurred, but media reports said it was in the al-Bab area.

Brazilians take to streets again to demand Bolsonaro's impeachment
World

Brazilians take to streets again to demand Bolsonaro's impeachment

By Marcelo Rochabrun SAO PAULO (Reuters) - Protesters took to the streets in several Brazilian cities on Saturday to demand the impeachment of far-right President Jair Bolsonaro, whose popularity has fallen in recent weeks amid corruption scandals against the backdrop of the pandemic. This week, news broke that Brazil's defense ministry told congressional leadership that next year's elections would not take place without amending the country's electronic voting system to include a paper trail of each vote. Bolsonaro has suggested several times without evidence that the current system is prone to fraud, allegations that Brazil's government has denied