Honduras says U.S. agrees to prolong Honduran migration accord

By Gustavo Palencia TEGUCIGALPA (Reuters) - Washington has agreed to prolong temporary migration protections for Hondurans living in the United States following two devastating hurricanes that battered their country last month, Honduran President Juan Orlando Hernandez said on Monday.

Reuters December 08, 2020 00:10:38 IST
Honduras says U.S. agrees to prolong Honduran migration accord

Honduras says US agrees to prolong Honduran migration accord

By Gustavo Palencia

TEGUCIGALPA (Reuters) - Washington has agreed to prolong temporary migration protections for Hondurans living in the United States following two devastating hurricanes that battered their country last month, Honduran President Juan Orlando Hernandez said on Monday.

Hernandez's comments came after Honduras on Friday requested that the United States extend the Temporary Protected Status (TPS) of about 44,000 of its citizens, due to expire Jan. 4, to help deal with the impact of hurricanes Eta and Iota.

"In the United States, during the meeting with the acting secretary of the Department of Homeland Security (Chad Wolf), they told us that the TPS that was going to end in January will be extended," Hernandez said on national television.

The DHS has not announced any changes to TPS and did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Hernandez did not say how long the protections would be extended, though past TPS extensions have been for between a year and 18 months.

Hernandez and Foreign Minister Lisandro Rosales put the request to Wolf in Washington last week during a visit to seek aid after Eta and Iota affected millions of Hondurans, damaged or destroyed nearly 80,000 homes and killed 100 people.

Guatemala has also requested extended TPS protection for its citizens.

Hondurans living in the United States have had access to TPS since the accord was brokered after Hurricane Mitch wreaked havoc on the impoverished Central American country in 1998.

Hundreds of thousands of immigrants from El Salvador, Haiti and Nepal were due to be expelled from the United States in early March after a wind-down period, according to a court ruling that sided with the Trump administration and was expected to also affect Hondurans under TPS.

The incoming U.S. government of President-elect Joe Biden is not expected to follow through with the expulsions.

They are among more than 1 million Hondurans living legally and illegally in the United States who send about $5 billion a year back home, a major source of economic support for Honduras.

(Reporting by Gustavo Palencia; additional reporting by Ted Hesson in Washington; writing by David Alire Garcia and Cassandra Garrison; Editing by Jonathan Oatis)

This story has not been edited by Firstpost staff and is generated by auto-feed.

Updated Date:

TAGS:

also read

France, Germany to agree to NATO role against Islamic State - sources
| Reuters
World

France, Germany to agree to NATO role against Islamic State - sources | Reuters

By Robin Emmott and John Irish | BRUSSELS/PARIS BRUSSELS/PARIS France and Germany will agree to a U.S. plan for NATO to take a bigger role in the fight against Islamic militants at a meeting with President Donald Trump on Thursday, but insist the move is purely symbolic, four senior European diplomats said.The decision to allow the North Atlantic Treaty Organization to join the coalition against Islamic State in Syria and Iraq follows weeks of pressure on the two allies, who are wary of NATO confronting Russia in Syria and of alienating Arab countries who see NATO as pushing a pro-Western agenda."NATO as an institution will join the coalition," said one senior diplomat involved in the discussions. "The question is whether this just a symbolic gesture to the United States

China's Xi says navy should become world class
| Reuters
World

China's Xi says navy should become world class | Reuters

BEIJING Chinese President Xi Jinping on Wednesday called for greater efforts to make the country's navy a world class one, strong in operations on, below and above the surface, as it steps up its ability to project power far from its shores.China's navy has taken an increasingly prominent role in recent months, with a rising star admiral taking command, its first aircraft carrier sailing around self-ruled Taiwan and a new aircraft carrier launched last month.With President Donald Trump promising a US shipbuilding spree and unnerving Beijing with his unpredictable approach on hot button issues including Taiwan and the South and East China Seas, China is pushing to narrow the gap with the U.S. Navy.Inspecting navy headquarters, Xi said the navy should "aim for the top ranks in the world", the Defence Ministry said in a statement about his visit."Building a strong and modern navy is an important mark of a top ranking global military," the ministry paraphrased Xi as saying.