Hacked emails show Clinton aides surprised at 2015 email revelations | Reuters

By Jonathan Allen | NEW YORK NEW YORK Two aides in charge of running Hillary Clinton's presidential campaign were taken aback as news broke in March 2015 of Clinton's use of private email for her work as U.S. secretary of state, according to stolen emails published on Thursday by WikiLeaks.The late-night exchange between Robby Mook, Clinton's campaign manager, and John Podesta, the campaign chairman, happened within hours of the New York Times breaking the news that Clinton exclusively used a private email account in a way that may have broken records rules.'Did you have any idea of the depth of this story?' Podesta wrote to Mook at 10:27 p.m

Reuters October 28, 2016 01:31:58 IST
Hacked emails show Clinton aides surprised at 2015 email revelations
| Reuters

Hacked emails show Clinton aides surprised at 2015 email revelations
 Reuters

By Jonathan Allen
| NEW YORK

NEW YORK Two aides in charge of running Hillary Clinton's presidential campaign were taken aback as news broke in March 2015 of Clinton's use of private email for her work as U.S. secretary of state, according to stolen emails published on Thursday by WikiLeaks.The late-night exchange between Robby Mook, Clinton's campaign manager, and John Podesta, the campaign chairman, happened within hours of the New York Times breaking the news that Clinton exclusively used a private email account in a way that may have broken records rules."Did you have any idea of the depth of this story?" Podesta wrote to Mook at 10:27 p.m. on the night the Times story appeared online, according to an exchange published by WikiLeaks.A few hours later, at 1:32 a.m., Mook wrote back: "Nope. We brought up the existence of emails in research this summer but were told that everything was taken care of." The exchange took place hours before the Associated Press reported for the first time the following morning that Clinton's email system was run off a private server Clinton kept in the basement of her home in Chappaqua, New York.The exchange appears to show that even Clinton's most senior aides were initially unprepared for the scale of revelations about Clinton's email practices, which would end up dogging her campaign all the way through to the final weeks leading up to the Nov. 8 election. Clinton, the Democratic candidate, remains the front-runner in opinion polls over Republican opponent Donald Trump.

Many voters have pointed to the unauthorised email system, which stymied attempts by the public to seek Clinton's emails through open-records laws, as a reason they find Clinton untrustworthy. Trump has repeatedly attacked her over her emails, saying Clinton should be in prison because she sent and received classified government secrets through the server. After a yearlong investigation, James Comey, the director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, said in July that Clinton and her staff were "extremely careless" with classified information, but that no reasonable prosecutor would bring charges.The same night of the Mook-Podesta exchange, Neera Tanden, a longtime Clinton confidante, wrote to Podesta to express her frustration, according to other emails stolen from Podesta's account and published in daily batches this month by WikiLeaks, a publishing organisation that advocates extreme government transparency."Why didn't they get this stuff out like 18 months ago?" Tanden wrote, criticizing Cheryl Mills, a lawyer working for Clinton and Clinton's former chief of staff at the State Department. "So crazy."

Podesta replied with a single word: "Unbelievable.""I guess I know the answer," Tanden, an outside adviser who does not have a formal role in the campaign, responded. "They wanted to get away with it." Podesta also suggests in the exchange that other Clinton aides withheld information about the emails, although it is unclear if he meant from the public or other colleagues.

"Speaking of transparency, our friends Kendall, Cheryl and Phillipe sure weren't forthcoming on the facts here," Podesta wrote. David Kendall is another lawyer working for Clinton, and Philippe Reines, whose first name Podesta appeared to have misspelled, is a Clinton adviser who handled her news coverage at the State Department.Tanden and spokesmen for Clinton's campaign did not respond to questions. The campaign has generally declined to comment on or authenticate specific emails, although it has not pointed to any instances of doctored messages. Glen Caplin, a campaign spokesman, has said the Russian government is behind the hacking of Podesta emails in an effort to influence the U.S. election.Nearly five months after the news of Clinton's private email first broke, Tanden again wrote to Podesta to link the arrangement to unfavourable public polling that week."Do we actually know who told Hillary she could use a private email?" she wrote. "And has that person been drawn and quartered?" (Editing by Jonathan Oatis)

This story has not been edited by Firstpost staff and is generated by auto-feed.

Updated Date:

also read

Air strikes kill 26, mostly children in Syria's Idlib - rescuers, monitor
| Reuters
World

Air strikes kill 26, mostly children in Syria's Idlib - rescuers, monitor | Reuters

BEIRUT Air strikes by Syrian or Russian warplanes killed at least 26 people, most of them school children, in a village in Syria's rebel-held Idlib province on Wednesday, rescue workers and a monitoring group said.The raids hit a residential area and a school in Haas village, the Syrian Civil Defence rescue workers network said on its Facebook account. A report on Syrian state TV quoted a military source saying a number of militants had been killed when their positions were targeted in Haas, but did not mention a school.Syria's civil war pits President Bashar al-Assad, backed by Russia, Iran and Shi'ite Muslim militias from Lebanon, Iraq and Afghanistan against an array of mostly Sunni Muslim rebel groups including some backed by Turkey, Gulf monarchies and the United States.Idlib, near Aleppo in northwest Syria, contains the largest populated area controlled by rebels, both nationalist groups under the banner of the Free Syrian Army and Islamist ones including the former al Qaeda affiliate Jabhat Fateh al-Sham. The Civil Defence network, which operates in rebel-held areas in the country, said 20 of the dead in Wednesday's attacks were children

Imran Khan says mass protest no danger to Pakistan democracy
| Reuters
Fwire

Imran Khan says mass protest no danger to Pakistan democracy | Reuters

By Kay Johnson and Drazen Jorgic | ISLAMABAD ISLAMABAD Pakistani opposition leader Imran Khan on Sunday dismissed accusations his planned shutdown of the nation's capital could lead to a military coup, saying Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif "can't hide behind 'democracy in danger'" to quash protests.Khan, a former national cricket hero, has vowed to bring a million people into Islamabad on Wednesday to paralyse the government and force Sharif either to resign or allow an inquiry into the "Panama Papers" revelations about his family's offshore wealth.Sharif's ruling PML-N party has accused Khan's Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf (PTI) party of endangering democracy by attempting to draw Pakistan's powerful military into a political dispute - a sensitive issue in a nation where the army has a history of staging coups.Reuters interviewed Khan at his plush home in the hills above Islamabad, where he says the police have him under virtual house arrest after the city banned public gatherings ahead of Wednesday's planned protest and arrested scores of PTI workers.He dismissed claims he wants the army to topple Sharif, as it did when Sharif was in power in the 1990s, and said the protests aim to hold the prime minister to account for alleged corruption."How can a democrat want the military to come in?," Khan said. "He has to answer. He can't hide behind 'democracy in danger'."Pakistan's military has repeatedly refused to comment on Wednesday's planned protests.Relations between the PML-N party and the military soured earlier this month after a newspaper report about a top-level national security meeting angered the army, prompting the removal of one of Sharif's cabinet ministers blamed for the leak.The tense relations, as well as the rowing between Sharif and Khan, have stirred unease and prompted newspaper editorial warnings that a descent into street chaos could trigger military intervention.On Sunday, one of Sharif's closest allies, Planning Minister Ahsan Iqbal, wrote in the English-language The News newspaper that Khan was "willing to derail democracy for personal gains".The attack adds to long-held suspicions by PML-N supporters that Khan is being used by the military in a power struggle with the civilian government, which has ceded control of key policy areas such as relations with India and Afghanistan to the military

Clinton says 'there is no case here' in FBI email investigation
| Reuters
World

Clinton says 'there is no case here' in FBI email investigation | Reuters

KENT, Ohio Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton said on Monday that she welcomed the FBI to look at the emails in the latest twist in the controversy over her use of a private server while she was secretary of state."There is no case here," Clinton said at a rally at Kent State University, telling supporters she was confident the FBI would reach the same conclusion as it did in a year-long investigation - that there were no grounds for any charges.