Georgia state likely to go through recount in US presidential election - secretary of state

By Simon Lewis and Daphne Psaledakis WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Georgia's secretary of state on Friday said he expects a recount due to the small margin for the presidential election in the battleground state, where Democrat Joe Biden has a small lead over Republican President Donald Trump. The presidential candidates each had 49.4% of counted ballots, though Biden was ahead by 1,579 votes as of Friday morning with 4,169 left to count, Georgia's voting system implementation manager, Gabriel Sterling, said. 'With a margin that small, there will be a recount,' Brad Raffensperger, Georgia's secretary of state, told reporters

Reuters November 07, 2020 00:11:49 IST
Georgia state likely to go through recount in US presidential election - secretary of state

Georgia state likely to go through recount in US presidential election  secretary of state

By Simon Lewis and Daphne Psaledakis

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Georgia's secretary of state on Friday said he expects a recount due to the small margin for the presidential election in the battleground state, where Democrat Joe Biden has a small lead over Republican President Donald Trump.

The presidential candidates each had 49.4% of counted ballots, though Biden was ahead by 1,579 votes as of Friday morning with 4,169 left to count, Georgia's voting system implementation manager, Gabriel Sterling, said.

"With a margin that small, there will be a recount," Brad Raffensperger, Georgia's secretary of state, told reporters.

Officials said about 9,000 military and overseas ballots were still outstanding and could be accepted if they arrive on Friday and are postmarked on Tuesday or earlier.

There are two ways of seeking a recount in Georgia. A presidential candidate who loses by 0.5% of the vote or less can force a recount by sending a written request to the secretary of state, or a candidate can ask the secretary of state to conduct one by alleging a “discrepancy or error” in the vote tabulation. In that case, state law gives the secretary discretion about whether to conduct a recount.

Local election officials in Georgia also can conduct recounts in their counties if they think there is a discrepancy in the results.

The Southern state switched to new touch-screen voting machines this year. After a voter makes their choices, the machine produces a marked paper ballot that’s fed into a scanner that counts the vote.

Absentee voters – hundreds of thousands this year – filled out the same ballots, which also were fed into the scanners. If the scanner cannot read the ballot, a bipartisan group of election officials reviews it to determine whether or how it should be counted.

A recount essentially repeats that process, and in the past has not made big changes in the results.

Because of that, a recount is considered unlikely to have a big effect on the state’s vote totals.

(Reporting by Simon Lewis, Daphne Psaledakis and Brad Heath; Editing by Chizu Nomiyama and Jonathan Oatis)

This story has not been edited by Firstpost staff and is generated by auto-feed.

Updated Date:

TAGS:

Find latest and upcoming tech gadgets online on Tech2 Gadgets. Get technology news, gadgets reviews & ratings. Popular gadgets including laptop, tablet and mobile specifications, features, prices, comparison.

also read

Eyewall of climate 'bomb' Iota brings catastrophic winds to Central America
Business

Eyewall of climate 'bomb' Iota brings catastrophic winds to Central America

By Gustavo Palencia and Ismael Lopez TEGUCIGALPA (Reuters) - Hurricane Iota began whipping a remote coastal area of Nicaragua with catastrophic winds, storm surges and rain on Monday evening, as the region's leaders blamed climate change for destruction that is pushing millions closer to hunger. Iota was due to crash through northeastern Nicaragua's Miskito region overnight, packing maximum sustained winds of 160 miles (260 km) per hour, having reached Category 5 on the Saffir-Simpson scale, the U.S

Egypt showcases scores of 2,500-year-old coffins
World

Egypt showcases scores of 2,500-year-old coffins

SAQQARA, Egypt (Reuters) - Egypt on Saturday showcased more than 100 coffins dating back 2,500 years, the latest and largest find this year in the vast burial ground of the Saqqara Necropolis.     The 26th Dynasty coffins - sealed, finely painted and well-preserved - were of a higher quality than previous finds there, said the secretary-general of the supreme council of antiquities, Mostafa Waziri, suggesting they belonged to higher ranking families.

Ukraine's health minister tests positive for COVID-19 as cases rise
World

Ukraine's health minister tests positive for COVID-19 as cases rise

KYIV (Reuters) - Ukrainian Health Minister Maksym Stepanov said on Saturday he had tested positive for COVID-19, shortly after announcing the country had posted a record number of new cases in a single day. "This is a war, every day the virus takes the lives of Ukrainians," Stepanov told a televised briefing at which he said 12,524 new cases had been registered in the previous 24 hours, up from the record of 11,787 a day earlier