Four in ten supporters of Biden, Trump would not accept election defeat

By Chris Kahn (Reuters) - More than four in ten supporters of both President Donald Trump and his Democratic challenger, Joe Biden, said they would not accept the result of the November election if their preferred candidate loses, Reuters/Ipsos poll found.

Reuters October 26, 2020 05:10:18 IST
Four in ten supporters of Biden, Trump would not accept election defeat

Four in ten supporters of Biden Trump would not accept election defeat

By Chris Kahn

(Reuters) - More than four in ten supporters of both President Donald Trump and his Democratic challenger, Joe Biden, said they would not accept the result of the November election if their preferred candidate loses, Reuters/Ipsos poll found.

The survey, conducted from Oct. 13-20, shows 43% of Biden supporters would not accept a Trump victory, while 41% of Americans who want to re-elect Trump would not accept a win by Biden.

Smaller portions would take action to make their displeasure known: 22% of Biden supporters and 16% of Trump supporters said they would engage in street protests or even violence if their preferred candidate loses.

U.S. election officials are dealing with a series of challenges this year that have raised concerns about the public's confidence in the result.

Top national security officials warned last week that Russia and Iran have been hacking into U.S. voting systems and looking for ways to undermine the election.

Trump also has repeatedly questioned the integrity of U.S. elections, arguing that the process is "rigged" against him and repeatedly asserting without evidence that the surge in mail-in voting this year will increase the likelihood of voter fraud. He has refused to commit to a peaceful transfer of power if the vote count indicates he has lost.

Donald Green, a political scientist at Columbia University, said the poll results ease his concerns about post-election violence. But he warned that if the election is close, or one candidate can make a credible accusation of voter fraud, it could spark wider discontent and protests than the poll suggests.

"This is why many people who oppose Trump are holding their breath and hoping for a lopsided outcome that is not up for grabs," Green said.

The latest Reuters/Ipsos poll shows Biden leads Trump by 8 percentage points nationally: 51% of likely voters say they are backing the Democratic challenger while 43% are voting for the president.

Biden also is ahead in Wisconsin and Michigan, but the race appears to be much closer in other battleground states including Pennsylvania, Florida, Arizona and North Carolina.

The Reuters/Ipsos poll was conducted online, in English, throughout the United States. It gathered responses from 2,649 American adults, including 1,039 who said they had voted for Trump or were planning to vote for him, and 1,153 who said they were similarly backing Biden.

The poll has a credibility interval, a measure of precision, of 4 percentage points.

(Reporting by Chris Kahn; Editing by Daniel Wallis)

This story has not been edited by Firstpost staff and is generated by auto-feed.

Updated Date:

TAGS:

Find latest and upcoming tech gadgets online on Tech2 Gadgets. Get technology news, gadgets reviews & ratings. Popular gadgets including laptop, tablet and mobile specifications, features, prices, comparison.

also read

Bolivia's socialists sweep back to power as Arce sworn in as President
World

Bolivia's socialists sweep back to power as Arce sworn in as President

By Daniel Ramos LA PAZ (Reuters) - Bolivia's Luis Arce was sworn in as president on Sunday, ushering the country's powerful socialist party back into power a year after long-term leftist leader Evo Morales was ousted amid angry protests that sparked off a political crisis. Arce, 57, was inaugurated in a ceremony in the highland city of La Paz, in front of heads of state from Argentina, Paraguay, Colombia and Spain, as well as senior officials from Chile, Iran and the government of Venezuela's Nicolas Maduro. The unassuming and bespectacled former economy minister, feted as the architect of Bolivia's rapid growth under Morales, comes into office facing the huge task of healing the divisions of a political crisis and the coronavirus pandemic