Financial Times' story on Qatari princess' sex scandal disappears from website after being refuted

An alleged scandal about Qatari princess which Financial Times, a British publication had broken out has been has been termed as fake

FP Staff August 24, 2016 13:13:20 IST
Financial Times' story on Qatari princess' sex scandal disappears from website after being refuted

An alleged scandal about Qatari princess which Financial Times, a British publication  reported has been termed 'fake'. At the time of writing, a variety of news reports have contradicted the Financial Times story — that has subsequently vanished as several Google searches revealed. An extensive search for the report on the Financial Times' website proved equally fruitless.

Financial Times story on Qatari princess sex scandal disappears from website after being refuted

Representational image of Qatari Embassy in London. YouTube grab.

As per reports that quoted this piece, the British security service with the help of Scotland Yard raided a hotel room in which Sheikha Salwa, Princess of the Qatari Royal family was staying after receiving a lot of complaints. Following the raid, the security service was shocked to find the princess 'engaging in shamful orgy with seven men'. The identity of the princess was revealed when the security service checked her ID.

During the investigation, the princess admitted to being the half-sister of the Qatari King and claimed to have roped in the seven men through a Saudi intermediary.

According to Financial Times, the princess was under the impression that she was not offering any solicitation as per the British law and had no intention of tarnishing the image of her country. Later, the security service pointed out that she had indeed violated British law by engaging in prostitution with men with criminal records.

After the investigation, the British police had apprised the Qatar Embassy of the situation but they did not pay any heed. Further, reports have emerged that the Qatari Embassy in London tried to bribe Financial Times from carrying the story but the publication rejected the offer.

According to Siasat Daily, the photo of Qatari princess that has been doing the rounds is actually a morphed photo of Alia Al Mazrouei, Chief Operating Officer of Dubai based Mazrui Holdings.

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