FBI paid more than $1.3 million to break into San Bernardino iPhone | Reuters

WASHINGTON Federal Bureau of Investigation Director James Comey said on Thursday the agency paid more to get into the iPhone of one of the San Bernardino shooters than he will make in the remaining seven years and four months he has in his job.

Reuters April 22, 2016 00:31:54 IST
FBI paid more than $1.3 million to break into San Bernardino iPhone 
| Reuters

FBI paid more than 13 million to break into San Bernardino iPhone 
 Reuters

WASHINGTON Federal Bureau of Investigation Director James Comey said on Thursday the agency paid more to get into the iPhone of one of the San Bernardino shooters than he will make in the remaining seven years and four months he has in his job.

According to figures from the FBI and the U.S. Office of Management and Budget, Comey's annual salary as of January 2015 was $183,300. Without a raise or bonus, Comey will make $1.34 million over the remainder of his job.

That suggests the FBI paid the largest ever publicized amount for a hacking technique, given the most previously paid was $1 million by U.S. information security company Zerodium to break into phones.

Speaking at the Aspen Security Forum in London, Comey was asked by a moderator how much the FBI paid for the software that eventually broke into the iPhone.

"A lot. More than I will make in the remainder of this job, which is seven years and four months for sure," Comey said. "But it was, in my view, worth it."

The Justice Department said in March it had unlocked the San Bernardino shooter's iPhone with the help of an unidentified third party and dropped its case against Apple Inc (AAPL.O), ending a high-stakes legal clash but leaving the broader fight over encryption unresolved.

Comey said the FBI will be able to use software used on the San Bernardino phone on other 5C iPhones running IOS 9 software.

The FBI gained access to the iPhone used by Rizwan Farook, one of the shooters who killed 14 people in San Bernardino, California on Dec. 2.

The case raised the debate over whether technology companies' encryption technologies protect privacy or endanger the public by blocking law enforcement access to information.

(Reporting by Julia Edwards and Jim Finkle; Editing by Andrew Hay)

This story has not been edited by Firstpost staff and is generated by auto-feed.

Updated Date:

also read

COVID deaths in US climb to more than 1,900 a day for the first time since March
World

COVID deaths in US climb to more than 1,900 a day for the first time since March

Health experts say the vast majority of the hospitalised and dead have been unvaccinated

Hopeful those vaccinated with AstraZeneca would be eligible to enter the United States, says EU Commissioner
World

Hopeful those vaccinated with AstraZeneca would be eligible to enter the United States, says EU Commissioner

The US government on Monday announced that starting 1 November, it will lift the pandemic travel ban on all air passengers who are fully vaccinated and undergo testing and contact tracing.

Iraq's ancient Gilgamesh tablet set to return home after US returns artefact
World

Iraq's ancient Gilgamesh tablet set to return home after US returns artefact

Iraq has seen its historical artifacts looted for decades, including since the US invasion in 2003