Deforestation soars in Amazon forest in 2020, analysis finds

By Jake Spring BRASILIA (Reuters) - An area the size of Israel was deforested in the Amazon biome last year as destruction surged 21% in the region spanning nine countries that is home to the world's largest rainforest, according to the Amazon Conservation organization. A first look at deforestation in the full year of 2020 shows that roughly 21,000 square kilometers (8,108 square miles) of old-growth forest was cut or burned down, about the size of New Jersey, the U.S.-based non-profit group found in its analysis of satellite data.

Reuters January 28, 2021 00:12:30 IST
Deforestation soars in Amazon forest in 2020, analysis finds

Deforestation soars in Amazon forest in 2020 analysis finds

By Jake Spring

BRASILIA (Reuters) - An area the size of Israel was deforested in the Amazon biome last year as destruction surged 21% in the region spanning nine countries that is home to the world's largest rainforest, according to the Amazon Conservation organization.

A first look at deforestation in the full year of 2020 shows that roughly 21,000 square kilometers (8,108 square miles) of old-growth forest was cut or burned down, about the size of New Jersey, the U.S.-based non-profit group found in its analysis of satellite data.

"These numbers are just mind-blowing," said Matt Finer, who leads the NGO's Amazon monitoring project.

The Amazon biome is overwhelmingly dominated by rainforest but includes other ecosystems that share a similar set of plants and animals. Many parts of the Amazon experienced drier weather last year and were therefore more susceptible to fire.

Bolivia accounted for the biggest increase in destruction compared to 2019 as enormous fires tore through its Chiquitano dry forests, Finer said. Many Bolivians use slash-and-burn tactics to clear land for cattle or soy, and the fires can get out of control and escape into the forest in dry conditions.

Bolivia announced a state of emergency in October, saying that 600 families had been affected by the fires.

After Bolivia, Peru, Colombia and Ecuador saw smaller increases in deforestation.

Brazil had the most deforestation, accounting for 61% of the hotspots in the Amazon overall, although 2020 forest destruction was similar to 2019, Finer said.

"I think 2019 is regarded as a really bad year for the Brazilian Amazon. 2020 got less press and attention but it was just as bad, if not worse," he said.

The 2020 data is based on a preliminary analysis of deforestation alerts generated by the University of Maryland, with final figures to be confirmed later this year.

(Reporting by Jake Spring; Editing by Elaine Hardcastle)

This story has not been edited by Firstpost staff and is generated by auto-feed.

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