Coronavirus Outbreak: Sale of dog, cat meat banned in China’s Shenzhen from 1 May; one local confirmed positive over 24 hours

The Chinese city of Shenzhen has banned the eating of dogs and cats as part of a wider clampdown on the wildlife trade since the emergence of the new coronavirus

Reuters April 02, 2020 13:52:23 IST
Coronavirus Outbreak: Sale of dog, cat meat banned in China’s Shenzhen from 1 May; one local confirmed positive over 24 hours

Shenzhen: The Chinese city of Shenzhen has banned the eating of dogs and cats as part of a wider clampdown on the wildlife trade since the emergence of the new coronavirus .

Scientists suspect the coronavirus passed to humans from animals. Some of the earliest infections were found in people who had exposure to a wildlife market in the central city of Wuhan, where bats, snakes, civets and other animals were sold.

 <span class=Coronavirus Outbreak Sale of dog cat meat banned in Chinas Shenzhen from 1 May one local confirmed positive over 24 hours" width="380" height="285" />

Representational image. AP

The disease has infected more than 935,000 people around the world and killed some 47,000 of them.

Authorities in the southern Chinese technology hub said the ban on eating dogs and cats would come into force on 1 May.

“Dogs and cats as pets have established a much closer relationship with humans than all other animals, and banning the consumption of dogs and cats and other pets is a common practice in developed countries and in Hong Kong and Taiwan,” the city government said in an order posted on Wednesday.

“This ban also responds to the demand and spirit of human civilisation.”

China’s top legislature said in late February it was banning the trade and consumption of wild animals.

Follow LIVE Updates on coronavirus Outbreak here

Provincial and city governments across the country have been moving to enforce the ruling but Shenzhen has been the most explicit about extending that ban to dogs and cats.

Dogs, in particular, are eaten in several parts of Asia.

Liu Jianping, an official with the Shenzhen Center for Disease Prevention and Control, said that the poultry, livestock and seafood available to consumers were sufficient.

“There is no evidence showing that wildlife is more nutritious than poultry and livestock,” Liu was quoted as saying by the state-owned media Shenzhen Daily.

Shenzhen’s initial rules, first proposed in late February, appeared to ban the consumption of turtles and frogs - both common dishes in China’s south.

But the city government acknowledged this week that this had been a “a hot point of controversy” and clarified that both could be eaten.

The city’s campaign to stop the eating of wildlife has won praise from animal welfare groups.

Updated Date:

also read

European football clubs caught between a financial pit and hallowed grounds
Sports

European football clubs caught between a financial pit and hallowed grounds

As European football clubs struggle to make up for revenue lost in the pandemic, one untapped source of revenue is stadium naming rights, but exploiting them may not be straightforward.

COVID-19 tracker, 13 May: India records over 4,000 deaths for second straight day; 3,62,727 fresh cases in past 24 hrs
India

COVID-19 tracker, 13 May: India records over 4,000 deaths for second straight day; 3,62,727 fresh cases in past 24 hrs

The total caseload rose to 2,37,03,665, while the number of active cases rose to 37,10,525. The active cases comprise 15.65 percent of the total infections

COVID-19 vaccine trackers: Try these bots to locate inoculation centres, book vaccine appointment
News &amp; Analysis

COVID-19 vaccine trackers: Try these bots to locate inoculation centres, book vaccine appointment

Here is a list of some of the COVID-19 vaccine-tracking bots available in India right now.