Belgium plant denies blame for AstraZeneca vaccine cuts to EU

SENEFFE (Reuters) - A plant in Belgium said to be the cause of big cuts in AstraZeneca's COVID-19 vaccine supplies to the European Union said on Wednesday it had produced all doses required under a contract it has with the Anglo-Swedish firm.

Reuters February 11, 2021 00:11:29 IST
Belgium plant denies blame for AstraZeneca vaccine cuts to EU

Belgium plant denies blame for AstraZeneca vaccine cuts to EU

SENEFFE (Reuters) - A plant in Belgium said to be the cause of big cuts in AstraZeneca's COVID-19 vaccine supplies to the European Union said on Wednesday it had produced all doses required under a contract it has with the Anglo-Swedish firm.

The factory, which U.S. firm Thermo Fisher acquired from Novasep in January, has been identified as the cause of the cuts by AstraZeneca in internal meetings, several EU officials have said.

"We have complied with all the contractual requirements we have with AstraZeneca," Thermo Fisher's vice president for the EU, Cedric Volanti, told a news conference on Wednesday, when asked about possible production problems the plant had faced.

AstraZeneca was not immediately available for a comment.

AstraZeneca on Jan. 15 announced cuts in its supply of vaccines to the EU in the first quarter, which EU officials said amounted to a 60% reduction to 31 million doses through March.

EU officials repeatedly said AstraZeneca had told them the cause of the problem were production issues at the Novasep factory in Belgium, acquired by Thermo Fisher on Jan. 15.

Volanti declined to comment on the number of doses the company has committed to producing for AstraZeneca and underscored that the change of property had had no negative impact on the production capacity of the factory.

When asked whether the Belgian plant, located in Seneffe at an hour drive from Brussels, sold doses to Britain, Volanti said the company sends vaccines to an Italian facility that bottles them before delivering to clients.

EU Industry Commissioner Thierry Breton said he was confident about the production capacity of the Thermo Fisher's plant in Belgium.

(Reporting by Francesco Guarascio @fraguarascio; additional reporting by Ludwig Burger; editing by John Stonestreet and Elaine Hardcastle)

This story has not been edited by Firstpost staff and is generated by auto-feed.

Updated Date:

TAGS:

Subscribe to Moneycontrol Pro at ₹499 for the first year. Use code PRO499. Limited period offer. *T&C apply

also read

Robinhood now a go-to for young investors and short sellers
Business

Robinhood now a go-to for young investors and short sellers

By John McCrank NEW YORK (Reuters) - Robinhood, the online brokerage used by many retail traders to pile in to heavily shorted stocks like GameStop Corp, has made an ambitious push into loaning out its clients' shares to short sellers as it expands its business. The broker had $1.9 billion in shares loaned out as of Dec. 31, nearly three times the $674 million a year earlier, and it was permitted to lend out $4.6 billion worth of securities under margin agreements, around five times bigger than the prior year, according to an annual regulatory filing late on Monday

Wall Street mixed as Apple and Tesla retreat
Business

Wall Street mixed as Apple and Tesla retreat

By Noel Randewich (Reuters) - Wall Street was mixed on Tuesday, with Apple and Tesla losing ground, while materials and energy companies climbed as investors looked toward the U.S. Congress approving another stimulus package.

Biden's SEC nominee vows review of GameStop trading issues, climate disclosures
Business

Biden's SEC nominee vows review of GameStop trading issues, climate disclosures

By Pete Schroeder and Chris Prentice WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. President Joe Biden's pick to head a key market regulator promised on Tuesday a thorough review of issues raised by the GameStop Corp stock frenzy and suggested companies may have to disclose their potential risks from climate change