Australia says invasive search of women at Qatar airport referred to police

SYDNEY (Reuters) - An incident at Doha airport in which Australian women were subjected to an invasive search on the tarmac after the discovery of an abandoned newborn baby in the terminal has been referred to Australian federal police, Australia said. Women from the Qatar Airways flight, including 13 Australians, were forced to undergo a medical examination in an ambulance on the tarmac after the newborn was found in a bathroom at the Hamad International Airport, television network Seven News reported. Foreign Affairs Minister Marise Payne confirmed on Monday the women had contacted the Australian government at the time of the incident, earlier this month, and the Australian government had taken up the matter with the Qatari Ambassador.

Reuters October 26, 2020 07:10:39 IST
Australia says invasive search of women at Qatar airport referred to police

Australia says invasive search of women at Qatar airport referred to police

SYDNEY (Reuters) - An incident at Doha airport in which Australian women were subjected to an invasive search on the tarmac after the discovery of an abandoned newborn baby in the terminal has been referred to Australian federal police, Australia said.

Women from the Qatar Airways flight, including 13 Australians, were forced to undergo a medical examination in an ambulance on the tarmac after the newborn was found in a bathroom at the Hamad International Airport, television network Seven News reported.

Foreign Affairs Minister Marise Payne confirmed on Monday the women had contacted the Australian government at the time of the incident, earlier this month, and the Australian government had taken up the matter with the Qatari Ambassador.

She said the "extraordinary incident" had also been reported to the Australian Federal Police.

"This is a grossly disturbing, offensive, concerning set of events. It is not something I have ever heard of occurring in my life, in any context. We have made our views very clear to the Qatari authorities," Payne told media.

Hamad Airport has issued a statement saying the newborn remained unidentified and was receiving medical care, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation reported.

"Medical professionals expressed concern to officials about the health and welfare of a mother who had just given birth and requested she be located prior to departing (the airport)," the statement read.

The Australian government expected to see a report from Qatari authorities, who were still investigating the incident, by the end of the week, Payne said.

She said there were significant concerns over consent for the medical examination, adding "these are very private and personal matters".

An earlier Australian government statement said reports indicated treatment "beyond circumstances in which the women could give free and informed consent".

The women were provided with medical and psychological support when they arrived back in Sydney, and undertook the mandatory 14-day hotel quarantine Australia requires for COVID-19 border control, a spokesman for New South Wales state Health told Reuters.

(Reporting by Kirsty Needham; Editing by Michael Perry)

This story has not been edited by Firstpost staff and is generated by auto-feed.

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