Vera C Rubin Observatory captures stunning, record-breaking first photo of broccoli

It would need 378 4K ultra-HD TV screens to display one of them in full size and the resolution is so massive that one could see a golf ball from about 24 kilometres away.


The camera core of the Vera C Rubin Observatory has clicked its first test 3,200-megapixels digital photos – the largest ever taken in a single shot.

According to a statement by SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, the images are so large that it would take 378 4K ultra-high-definition TV screens to display one of them in full size. It added that the resolution is so massive that one could see a golf ball from about 24 kilometres away.

A head of Romanesco – a type of broccoli – that was chosen for its very detailed surface structure, was one of these tests. Image credit: SLAC?NAtional acceslerated labroatary.

A head of Romanesco – a type of broccoli – that was chosen for its very detailed surface structure, was one of these tests. Image credit: SLAC/National accelerated laboratory.

The statement said that the sensor array will be integrated into the world's largest digital camera at SLAC and once observed in the Rubin Observatory in Chile, it will produce panoramic images of the complete Southern sky, once every night for 10 years.

The camera will feed data into the Rubin Observatory Legacy Survey of Space and Time (LSST), using which the observatory will create the largest astronomical movie of all time to shed light on some of the biggest mysteries of the universe, including dark matter and energy.

Vincent Riot, LSST Camera project manager from DOE’s Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory said that it is a huge milestone for them, adding, "The focal plane will produce the images for the LSST, so it’s the capable and sensitive eye of the Rubin Observatory.”

SLAC’s Steven Kahn, director of the observatory added that the achievement is among the most significant of the entire Rubin Observatory.

Kahn said that the completion of the LSST Camera focal plane and its successful tests is a huge victory by the camera team. This will enable Rubin Observatory to deliver next-generation astronomical science.

The first 3,200 MP images are of a variety of objects including a head of Romanesco – a type of broccoli – that was chosen for its very detailed surface structure.

SLAC’s Aaron Roodman, who is responsible for the assembly and testing of the LSST Camera, stated that taking the images is a major accomplishment, adding that they managed to push the limits of what's possible by taking advantage of every square millimetre of the focal plane and maximising the science of what can be done with it.


Find latest and upcoming tech gadgets online on Tech2 Gadgets. Get technology news, gadgets reviews & ratings. Popular gadgets including laptop, tablet and mobile specifications, features, prices, comparison.