The third and final solar eclipse of 2018 is coming up — with strings attached

The eclipse will be visible only in the Northern hemisphere, best from a few places near the Pole.

We're fast approaching a partial solar eclipse this weekend — Surya grahan, if you will — on Saturday, 11 August, 2018.

A partial solar eclipse is visible to Earthlings as a crescent Sun, hidden partially by the moon, the shadow of which falls on the Earth. This time around though, at no point during the partial solar eclipse will the center of the moon's shadow fall on the Earth. That mean far less of the shadow on Earth overall — and fewer satisfied skygazers.

This particular eclipse on 11 August will bless most of the Northern Hemisphere with a view, according to a report by SpaceAstronomers from NASA Goddard have sour news for eclipse-chasers in India. The partial eclipse will hardly be visible from countries that fall below Arctic Circle — India among them.

Why so partial, chandu chaacha?

Representational Image. Reuters

Representational Image. Reuters

The climax of a partial eclipse — when the maximum area of the moon's shadow falls on the Earth — happens to also be when the sun is closest to the Earth's horizon; the Earth's horizon, in this case, being be the closest point on Earth facing the Sun at any given time.

The eclipse officially begins at 1.32 pm IST with the moon entering the Sun's disk, casting an early shadow over Greenland. It will continue to brush over Northern Europe, Iceland and the North Pole, covering most of Russia in a transient shadow before dipping down in China's horizon.

The eclipse will be at it's maximum coverage at 3:15 pm.

Space explains that the event this year will largely be for the eyes of those in the Northern Hemisphere, visible only from a handful of place near the North Pole. While eclipse-chasers in India won't be as lucky this time, views of the partial eclipse from the North and South poles are expected to be unbeatable.

If by luck or travel, you do happen to sneak a peak, don't forget protective eye-wear. Some safety glasses to avoid damage to yours eyes, and a filter onto your photography equipment before the eclipse begins.





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